Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 5)

AND THE WEAK SUFFER WHAT THEY MUST? by Yanis Varoufakis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A defensive but astute, cerebral, and engrossing polemic that conveys knowledge and authority."
The former Greek finance minister argues that the lack of political will and democratic consensus in the euro crisis portends a drift toward authoritarianism. Read full book review >
WELCOME TO THE POISONED CHALICE by James K. Galbraith
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 21, 2016

"A book best read by policy wonks of a numerate bent but accessible to noneconomists as well."
A series of essays, letters, and other documents examining the latest Greek tragedy. Read full book review >

MONEY CHANGES EVERYTHING by William N. Goetzmann
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 2016

"For the numerate and fiscally wonky, an accessible survey that does a fine job of reallocating past, present, and future."
A financial economist's view of credit, investment, speculation, and other matters of the pocketbook. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 21, 2016

"Indian casinos are likely to be around for a long time to come, and Mitchell's exposé goes a long way toward explaining the whys and hows."
That casino on the nearby reservation? Think of it as revenge for Christopher Columbus, as some wags have put it—but also a sophisticated operation that makes use of every legal loophole available. Read full book review >
FAMINE, AFFLUENCE, AND MORALITY by Peter Singer
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 2, 2015

"A useful compendium of a seminal article and its offshoots, and it couldn't be timelier."
A distinguished philosopher offers his past and present thinking on the subject of moral obligations that members of affluent societies have to those living in extreme poverty. Read full book review >

WHO COOKED ADAM SMITH'S DINNER? by Katrine Marçal
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 6, 2016

"An exciting reassessment of the global economy that provocatively extends the frontiers of the feminist critique."
A Swedish political and economic writer shows why "feminism's best-kept secret is just how necessary a feminist perspective is in the search for a solution to our mainstream economic problems. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 2016

"Whitaker proves herself a genial, informed companion for a journey toward 'creative flexibility.'"
How to foster creativity in any workplace. Read full book review >
THE PRICE OF PROSPERITY by Todd G. Buchholz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A refreshing book that offers an alternative to the failing shibboleths of the day."
How to renew the greatness of rich but potentially failing nations, like the United States. Read full book review >
A Paperboy's Fable by Deep Patel
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A finely crafted business fable steeped in meaning; made all the more remarkable by the author's youth."
A parable reveals several business truths through the eyes of an enterprising paperboy. Read full book review >
BRILLIANCE AND FIRE by Rachelle Bergstein
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Bergstein's book is an informative, well-written, and entertaining window onto another way of life."
Bergstein (Women from the Ankle Down: The Story of Shoes and How They Define Us, 2012) provides a history of diamond mining and marketing that reveals the deadly world behind this magical stone.Read full book review >
THIS BRAVE NEW WORLD by Anja Manuel
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 10, 2016

"Clearly laid out motivation for harmonious future relations with China and India."
A solid general overview of the dynamics among India, China, and the United States—and why the U.S. should pay close attention. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 16, 2010

"A comprehensive primer on the business skills essential for physicians."
A doctors' guide to entrepreneurship contains practical advice on everything from hiring and billing to insurance and patents. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >