Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 5)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"The authors are necessarily forceful, and they offer a well-written must-read for those ready to give up hope about politics and government in the United States."
An examination of how "the rapid proliferation of a system akin to oligarchy—within our own country—threatens to cripple our march forward." Read full book review >
POWERING FORWARD by Bill Ritter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"Ritter lacks the pizzazz of Sernovitz, who sees another kind of energy revolution taking place, but he presents arguments cleanly and forcefully."
An informative why-and-how book about preventing climate change by making the transition to clean energy. Read full book review >

EVICTED by Matthew Desmond
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"This stunning, remarkable book—a scholar's 21st-century How the Other Half Lives—demands a wide audience."
A groundbreaking work on the central role of housing in the lives of the poor. Read full book review >
THROWING ROCKS AT THE GOOGLE BUS by Douglas Rushkoff
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"A powerful exposé of an underdiscussed downside to the digital revolution."
Rushkoff (Theory and Digital Economics/CUNY, Queens; Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now, 2013, etc.) looks behind marketing hype to examine the nexus of digital technology and the economy.Read full book review >
ALL THE SINGLE LADIES by Rebecca Traister
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"An easy read with lots of good anecdotes, a dose of history, and some surprising statistics, but its focus on one segment of one generation of single women is a drawback."
A feminist journalist argues that single women, who now outnumber married women in the United States, are changing society in major ways. Read full book review >

FROM SILK TO SILICON by Jeffrey E. Garten
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Of interest to students of economic history, though less intellectually compelling than David Warsh's Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations (2006) or even Robert Allen's Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction (2011)."
Yale economic historian Garten (The Big Ten: The Big Emerging Markets and How They Will Change Our Lives, 1997, etc.) looks at 10 pioneers of the new global economy, from Genghis Khan to Deng Xiaoping.Read full book review >
NARCONOMICS by Tom Wainwright
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"A daring work of investigative journalism and a well-reasoned argument for smarter drug policies."
In his first book, seasoned journalist Wainwright asks a radical question: what if we stopped looking at drug cartels as armies of faceless gangsters and instead analyzed them as innovative global businesses? Read full book review >
SMALL DATA by Martin Lindstrom
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Lindstrom's uncanny ability to detect and decipher seemingly unrelated clues will inspire reporters and detectives as well as companies looking for ways to develop new products and ideas."
A leading marketing guru recounts his firsthand experiences investigating the lives of consumers to develop global branding strategies. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"The old pep talk by another proficient motivational master, updated with references to Twitter, YouTube, and, of course, TED."
A self-help book from a communications coach and respected keynote speaker. Read full book review >
DEAR CHAIRMAN by Jeff Gramm
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Now that shareholders have secured their right to exercise control, Gramm's compelling account raises questions about where and how the new situation will affect the continuing maximization of profits."
The rise and triumph of shareholder activism through the previously unpublished letters of some of the U.S.'s most successful investors. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"An insider's cheerful, energetic examination of an industry that has changed dramatically in the last decade."
An account of the boom in oil and gas production in the United States. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Netizens and white-hat programmers will be familiar with Segal's arguments, but most policymakers will not—and they deserve wide discussion."
The director of the Council of Foreign Relations' cyberspace policy program warns that the days of the open Internet may be closing as the medium becomes increasingly lawless. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >