Business & Economics Book Reviews

THE COMPLACENT CLASS by Tyler Cowen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A book that will undoubtedly stir discussion—as many of Cowen's books do—with readers divided about how they stand based on where they currently sit."
An influential economist seeks to persuade readers that American citizens have gotten overly complacent, that a crisis point is near, and that a widespread rebellion may alter the existing order. Read full book review >
LOWER ED by Tressie McMillan Cottom
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Cottom does a good job of making the name 'Lower Ed' stick, and she makes a solid case for reviewing the entire system of higher education for openness of opportunity."
An informal sociological study of diploma mills and their often ripped-off discontents. Read full book review >

A GENERATION OF SOCIOPATHS by Bruce Cannon Gibney
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"'This is a deeply negative portrayal, but a certain negativity may be what's required.' Maybe so, but if this polemic makes wounded millennials feel better, it likely won't reach older ears, who may be more sympathetic than Gibney imagines."
A cri de coeur against baby boomers, who "unraveled the social fabric woven by previous generations in the interests of sheer selfishness." Read full book review >
HOW TO KILL A CITY by Peter Moskowitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A harsh critic of the forces changing urban life paints a vivid and grim picture of the future of American cities."
A freelance journalist reveals the many evils of gentrification. Read full book review >
IRRESISTIBLE by Adam Alter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A clearly written account of a widespread social malady that is sure to gain further attention in coming years."
How interactive technologies facilitate newly debilitating addictions. Read full book review >

A RABBLE OF DEAD MONEY by Charles R. Morris
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Both neophytes and experts will find something provocative and rewarding in this unfailingly interesting treatment."
Morris (Comeback: America's New Economic Boom, 2013, etc.) revisits history's greatest economic meltdown. Read full book review >
EVERYTHING UNDER THE HEAVENS by Howard W. French
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A lucid if stolid overview of regional history, useful for students of Pacific affairs in playing out scenarios of what might happen next."
A long-view look at events that are making China's neighbors—and much of the world beyond—very nervous indeed. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"The book will have some appeal for certain sectors of the sociology community, but it is likely too narrowly focused to reach a wider audience."
New York-born, Toronto-based writer Bovy debuts with an exploration of how the idea of "privilege" has morphed over the years and now "plays an enormous role in the online shaming culture." Read full book review >
TEETH by Mary Otto
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A focused, well-researched depiction of the dental industry's social and cultural relevance and its dire need for reform."
An astute examination of the complex, insular business of oral health care. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A strong case that deserves a wider readership than just policy wonks."
An examination of economic inequality—unsurprisingly, the title refers to race as well as economic class. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"Full of object lessons, this is a valuable overview for students of international commerce."
There are new markets to share out there, and the old capitalist way of doing things won't be the one that captures them. Read full book review >
BEYOND $15 by Jonathan Rosenblum
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"An inspiring model for coalition-building."
A veteran (30-plus years) labor organizer tells the story of the Seattle-Tacoma area's successful $15-per-hour minimum wage campaign and looks forward to a future revival of the labor movement. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >