Business & Economics Book Reviews

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 3, 2016

"A hopeful and optimistic treatise that will surely be required reading for performing arts students."
A guidebook for aspiring performing artists to help them navigate the business side of showbiz. Read full book review >
DETROIT HUSTLE by Amy Haimerl
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"An engaging and cautiously optimistic memoir of making a new life."
A journalist's account of how and why she took a chance on a new life and home-rehabilitation project in the down-and-out city of Detroit. Read full book review >

BEER MONEY by Frances Stroh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction."
Detroit's decadeslong public death spiral mirrors the steady dissolution of one of the city's most prominent clans: the Stroh family of brewers. Read full book review >
THE AUCTIONEER by Simon de Pury
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"At times, the narrative reads like a gossip rag for the fabulously wealthy, but it's an enjoyable book that lets us live vicariously in the haut monde."
Renowned auctioneer de Pury presents a memoir full of gossip, anecdotes, and tales of the very, very rich. Read full book review >
GRIT by Angela Duckworth
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 3, 2016

"Not your grandpa's self-help book, but Duckworth's text is oddly encouraging, exhorting us to do better by trying harder, and a pleasure to read."
Gumption: it's not just for readers of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, as this debut book, blending anecdote and science, statistic and yarn, capably illustrates.Read full book review >

THE DOG MERCHANTS by Kim Kavin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 2, 2016

"A scathing indictment of an industry run amok; belongs on every pet lover's bookshelf."
A hard-hitting exploration of the idea of "dogs as a product." Read full book review >
UNEQUAL GAINS by Peter H. Lindert
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 2016

"Some familiarity with economic principles will benefit readers, but its conclusions are both accessible and urgent."
A long-view look at a problem that has been vexing economists and policymakers lately—namely, financial and social inequality. Read full book review >
SHOE DOG by Phil Knight
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 26, 2016

"By the numbers, to be sure, but students of business, for whom Nike is a well-established case study, may want to have this view straight from the source."
Nike mogul Knight charts the rise of his business empire, a world leader in athletic wear. Read full book review >
DETROIT RESURRECTED by Nathan Bomey
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 25, 2016

"An engaging reconstruction of Detroit's financial crisis and the broader implications of its comeback for other American cities."
A chronicle of the infamous bankruptcy of the Motor City, from financial mismanagement to rebirth. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"Levelheaded advice for students and parents on the best path to take from high school to employment."
A guide to help "dispel our fears about life after college." Read full book review >
THE GUNNING OF AMERICA by Pamela Haag
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A refreshingly unusual approach by an author admirably transparent about why she wrote the book and why she chose to avoid more traditional approaches."
An examination of the controversial realm of American gun culture through the perspective of gun manufacturers, with an emphasis on the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Read full book review >
RESKILLING AMERICA by Katherine S. Newman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A top-notch, highly accessible contribution to the business and popular economics literature."
Now that the tide of outsourcing employment has begun to turn, the time has come to think about how to reverse chronic unemployment among youth in the United States. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >