Business & Economics Book Reviews

The University of Berkshire Hathaway by Daniel Pecaut
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

"A rare view into the mind of Warren Buffett."
A record of 30 years of holding company Berkshire Hathaway's annual meetings, replete with insight into the minds of the company's leaders. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 25, 2015

"A common-sense volume on personal finance, written for men who take responsibility for their families' fiscal well-being."
An enthusiastic guide to financial planning focuses on the highly masculine. Read full book review >

Ravioli Rules by Alfred Manganiello
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 14, 2014

"A charming use of pasta creation as a learning metaphor for managers."
A seasoned administrator employs the analogy of making ravioli to convey key team concepts in this debut business book. Read full book review >
The Great Divide by Alan Nevin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

"A high-level, if uneven, summary of major trends in national and international economic development, with predictions about the zones likely to be strongest in the near future."
A new look at economic trends across the United States compares thriving regions with less successful areas. Read full book review >
EXILED IN AMERICA by Christopher Dum
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Dum's scholarly apparatus is on full display, which will please specialists but should not deter general readers. His exceptional view of what's happening to the weakest among us deserves a place on the same shelf with Matthew Desmond's groundbreaking book Evicted (2016)."
Dum (Sociology/Kent State Univ.) debuts with an ethnographic study of a year in the life of a residential motel. Read full book review >

SHADOW COURTS by Haley Sweetland Edwards
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Edwards does a great service for the public by turning the spotlight of disclosure on this dark corner of international relations."
TIME investigative reporter Edwards charges that the controversial Investor-State Dispute Settlement tribunals at the heart of many current trade deals represent a major shift in global relations in favor of private corporate interests. Read full book review >
GRAND HOTEL ABYSS by Stuart Jeffries
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A rich, intellectually meaty history."
Life inside the 20th-century's reigning citadel of pessimism, as told through the lives and (often conflicting) philosophies of its key thinkers. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 2016

"An insightful book that should be of interest to anyone who eats food, animal or not."
Unsentimental study of the dangers in how meat is produced and distributed around the world, particularly in the United States. Read full book review >
WEAPONS OF MATH DESTRUCTION by Cathy O'Neil
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An unusually lucid and readable look at the daunting algorithms that govern so many aspects of our lives."
How ill-conceived algorithms now micromanage America's economy, from advertising to prisons. Read full book review >
THE UPSIDE OF INEQUALITY by Edward Conard
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Unlikely to sway those for whom the idea of economic inequality is anathema, but a set of arguments worth considering."
Tax the rich? Even out the playing field? Bad idea, writes a famously contrarian financier. Read full book review >
THE CURSE OF CASH by Kenneth S. Rogoff
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"Money geeks are the primary audience, to be sure, but futurists and trend-watchers will also take interest in the author's proposals for phasing out cash."
A noted economist imagines a modern society that functions without paper money and coins. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A thoughtful and enthusiastic analysis of how more and more people are inventing and creating truly remarkable products and services."
The story behind modern tinkerers, inventors, and creators of all sorts of good stuff. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >