Business & Economics Book Reviews

Financial Inclusion at the Bottom of the Pyramid by Carol Realini
Released: July 14, 2015

"A provocative and heartening look at a revolution in financial services."
A detailed account of how new technologies are helping people excluded from traditional financial services, resulting in large-scale industry disruption. Read full book review >
Sales Intelligence by Timo T. Aijo
Released: Sept. 7, 2015

"Jam-packed with interesting ideas and appealing stories, Aijo's book is a highly useful reference for new salespeople and sales managers."
Sales veteran Aijo explains how intelligence—"both in information and smarts"—is a crucial tool for salespeople at all levels. Read full book review >

Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"A must for car lovers and plenty of interesting material to keep other curious readers flipping pages."
A chronicle of the frantic, ultracompetitive, and heroic early days of automobile manufacturing. Read full book review >
THE COSMOPOLITES by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A slim but powerful book of great interest to students of international law and current events."
Swiss-Canadian-Iranian journalist Abrahamian looks closely at modern internationality and the legal liminality that can accompany it. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"Rock-solid evidence on the rise of identity theft and the multiple steps one can take to counteract an attack."
Useful advice on protecting your identity. Read full book review >

STONED by Aja Raden
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"A lively, incisive cultural and social history."
A jewelry designer and historian's account of how the desire for diamonds, gold, and other precious stones and metals has shaped history. Read full book review >
THE CON MEN by Terry Williams
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A thoroughly researched academic study accessible to general readers."
Two sociology professors' survey of New York con artists and how these reviled but crafty opportunists manage to make a living in the city's informal economy. Read full book review >
The Abolition of Cash by David R. Warwick
Released: July 8, 2015

"A spirited argument to move beyond a cherished American institution, the physical dollar, into a digital payment future."
An intriguing, balanced study of a future cashless society. Read full book review >
Released: May 16, 2014

"A professionally packaged, well-written guide for people involved in financial decisions."
A handy, deskside reference on various types of corporate financing. Read full book review >
UNFINISHED BUSINESS by Anne-Marie Slaughter
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Informative guidance on how men and women can come together in the workforce and at home."
One woman's vision on how to create gender equality for men and women. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 9, 2015

"Spirited and straightforward; provides experience-based guidance to the enlightened investor."
This debut work presents a sophisticated, informed approach to investing. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"As comprehensive and knowledgeable as Hiro's earlier Inside India Today (1977; reissued 2013)."
An insider's economic report on the perils and scandals of India's precipitous drive into a market economy over the last decades. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >