NATIONAL COWBOY HALL OF FAME CHUCK WAGON COOKBOOK by Byron Price

NATIONAL COWBOY HALL OF FAME CHUCK WAGON COOKBOOK

Authentic Recipes from the Ranch and the Range
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KIRKUS REVIEW

 These recipes from real, live chuck wagon cooks do not always transfer well to indoor kitchens (many require the use of a grill), and their reliance on easily transported canned and preserved foodstuffs and disregard for caloric content make them even less applicable to the lives of most tenderfoots (``Few cowboys fret about their fat intake because they get plenty of exercise to work off any extra calories,'' warns the header over a recipe for potatoes with bacon, butter, half-and-half, sour cream, and cheese). On the other hand, Price (executive director of the Cowboy Hall of Fame) has packed the first part of the book, on cowboy traditions, with fascinating information on such unusual cowboy delicacies as ``mountain oysters'' (bull testicles) and techniques such as the use of sourdough starter. However, these chapters would have been put to better use had they been integrated with the recipes themselves. For example, the existence of regional dietary differences helps explain the inclusion of Quesadillas Ricas, with mango, roasted bell pepper, and melted Brie, as well as Avocado and Lime Salad with gelatin, mayonnaise, and pineapple. Although the results are on the heavy side, recipes are well edited and easy to follow. Buttermilk Rolls puff up nicely while baking, and Apple Spice Cake has a thick texture and pleasant nutmeg taste. A recipe for Cowboy Camp Coffee from the Bar B Ranch in Oklahoma is representative of the tone, instructing to add crumbled eggshell to the grounds for that ``gourmet'' touch. Well-researched history and authentic grub. (100 b&w photos, not seen)*justify no*  These recipes from real, live chuck wagon cooks do not always transfer well to indoor kitchens (many require the use of a grill), and their reliance on easily transported canned and preserved foodstuffs and disregard for caloric content make them even less applicable to the lives of most tenderfoots (``Few cowboys fret about their fat intake because they get plenty of exercise to work off any extra calories,'' warns the header over a recipe for potatoes with bacon, butter, half-and-half, sour cream, and cheese). On the other hand, Price (executive director of the Cowboy Hall of Fame) has packed the first part of the book, on cowboy traditions, with fascinating information on such unusual cowboy delicacies as ``mountain oysters'' (bull testicles) and techniques such as the use of sourdough starter. However, these chapters would have been put to better use had they been integrated with the recipes themselves. For example, the existence of regional dietary differences helps explain the inclusion of Quesadillas Ricas, with mango, roasted bell pepper, and melted Brie, as well as Avocado and Lime Salad with gelatin, mayonnaise, and pineapple. Although the results are on the heavy side, recipes are well edited and easy to follow. Buttermilk Rolls puff up nicely while baking, and Apple Spice Cake has a thick texture and pleasant nutmeg taste. A recipe for Cowboy Camp Coffee from the Bar B Ranch in Oklahoma is representative of the tone, instructing to add crumbled eggshell to the grounds for that ``gourmet'' touch. Well-researched history and authentic grub. (100 b&w photos, not seen)*justify no*  These recipes from real, live chuck wagon cooks do not always transfer well to indoor kitchens (many require the use of a grill), and their reliance on easily transported canned and preserved foodstuffs and disregard for caloric content make them even less applicable to the lives of most tenderfoots (``Few cowboys fret about their fat intake because they get plenty of exercise to work off any extra calories,'' warns the header over a recipe for potatoes with bacon, butter, half-and-half, sour cream, and cheese). On the other hand, Price (executive director of the Cowboy Hall of Fame) has packed the first part of the book, on cowboy traditions, with fascinating information on such unusual cowboy delicacies as ``mountain oysters'' (bull testicles) and techniques such as the use of sourdough starter. However, these chapters would have been put to better use had they been integrated with the recipes themselves. For example, the existence of regional dietary differences helps explain the inclusion of Quesadillas Ricas, with mango, roasted bell pepper, and melted Brie, as well as Avocado and Lime Salad with gelatin, mayonnaise, and pineapple. Although the results are on the heavy side, recipes are well edited and easy to follow. Buttermilk Rolls puff up nicely while baking, and Apple Spice Cake has a thick texture and pleasant nutmeg taste. A recipe for Cowboy Camp Coffee from the Bar B Ranch in Oklahoma is representative of the tone, instructing to add crumbled eggshell to the grounds for that ``gourmet'' touch. Well-researched history and authentic grub. (1

Pub Date: Feb. 20th, 1995
ISBN: 0-688-12989-7
Page count: 224pp
Publisher: Morrow/HarperCollins
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1st, 1994