THE BOOK OF MARMALADE by C. Anne Wilson

THE BOOK OF MARMALADE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An in-depth study of the history of marmalade, from the first written records of the substance (or something akin to it) to its preparation and consumption today. Marmalade purportedly first came from the Moors of North Africa, who taught the Portuguese how to eat it. Thence it was brought to England on the boats of Portuguese traders. Marmalade was originally made from quinces and was formed into blocks which were sliced with a knife. It was said to have medicinal qualities, from aiding digestion and increasing the appetite to curing colds and coughs. The author goes into great detail: refuting the long-held tradition that orange marmalade was invented by one Janet Keiller; noting the various prices that it sold for in the 16th century; tracing the decline of marmalade consumption in the 1960's. Scotland's ""most striking contribution"" was transferring the eating of marmalade from dinner (for which it was a dessert) to breakfast. All this and more can be learned from this book, which is well researched and illustrated. But one must obviously be gaga about marmalade to embark on the read; it is just not that intriguing a story for even the fanatic marmalade lover. Recipes are tacked on at the end and include both historical and modern versions, as well as marmalade's uses in meat cookery, sauces, puddings, and desserts. Among the more interesting ideas are Marmalade and Vermicelli Pudding, Orange Marmalade Muffins, and Pork Casserole. But the recipes are few in number; the book is primarily history.

Pub Date: Jan. 3rd, 1985
ISBN: 1903018773
Publisher: St. Martin's