THE ART OF DUTCH COOKING OR WHO THE DUTCH TREAT by C. Countess van Limburg Stirum

THE ART OF DUTCH COOKING OR WHO THE DUTCH TREAT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A preliminary discussion of how Dutch meals are organized according to time of day launches our dive into the unusual culinary arts of Holland with the warning that the bulk of Dutch cooking is dependent wholly on seasonal offerings. (Canned and frozen foods are not readily available). Cheese, a national favorite, is not an after--dinner savory here, therefore our first group of recipes features a slew of appetizers based on this item. Owing to the country's damp, cold climate, soup, often the center of the meal, plays an important role in Dutch cuisine. Recipes for Pea soup and Bean soup and in their leftover forms, Green soup and Curry soup are unique in this section. The national Hollandsa Koffietafel, a style of eating rather than a specific food, features cold cuts, cheeses, salads and small hot dishes many of which are presented here. Although oysters are the preferred fish delicacy, herring is the national fish dish, thus a good many recipes in this category are centered around it. Among the meat recipes, the author has limited herself to those which feature cuts available in this country and since the Dutch are so fond of the-meal-in-one-dish, further meat recipes can be found in the chapter on vegetables. Sauces, desserts and beverages round out a mouthwatering sampling of Dutch treats many of which are sure to find their way into American pots and pans because of their surprising simplicity.

Pub Date: July 7th, 1961
Publisher: Doubleday