THE LOVES OF GEORGE BERNARD SHAW by C. G. L.  Cann

THE LOVES OF GEORGE BERNARD SHAW

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The author, who has previously examined The Love Life of Charles Dickens, performs a slight probing exercise on the body of G.B.S.'s amorous works, from flirtation to philandering. Continent until he was twenty-nine, Shaw eventually built up a love life that at one time had seven women on the hook simultaneously. Yet, he was, the author thinks, physically undersexed or undermotivated, talked a good game, and took his love affairs -- except for those with his first love Alice Lockett and with his last great flame, Mrs. Pat Campbell--lightly. Among the many, there were Jenny atterson, a widow and his senior by some fifteen years, whose sensual attachment over eight years; there were Florence Farr, Janet Achurch for whom he wrote andida, Ellen Terry whom he wooed as much as an actress as a woman on paper, and Mrs. Pat Campbell, his Eliza -- all theatrical loves; among the Fabians, there were Annie Besant, May Morris, Eleanor Marx-Aveling, and his philoprogenitive friend land's wife, E. Nesbit. His marriage to Charlotte Payne-Townshend is proclaimed ow as a farce in its lack of consummation (still a moot point taken for granted ere); it did not alter Shaw's free ways. As he confided to Molly Tompkins in a ate love correspondence, ""Coquettes and philanderers are incorrigible"". Less commanding than Janet Dunbar's recent Mrs. G.B.S., a mild and fairly meaningless diversion.

Publisher: Funk & Wagnalls