ATHENIAN ADVENTURE by C. P. Lee

ATHENIAN ADVENTURE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A book difficult to classify. In no sense a true guidebook, nor yet an adventure tale, despite its title. One had hoped it would do for Greece what Kubly did for Italy, but it fails in the degree to which Lee lacks Kubly's contagious warmth of enthusiasm for his subject. The author, Tennessee born, a Rhodes scholar and later instructor at various universities, was Fulbright professor at the University of Athens, in 1955-56. The best parts of his book are those touching on Athens, his relationship with his pupils, his comments on his Greek friends. These sections are sympathetic and often charming. In fact, any chapter taken by itself, has considerable charm. But as a whole, the book falls of its own weight. His efforts to make parallels between modern Greece and New England are drawn out; his descriptions of comforts and discomforts- bad beds, noise, dust, and so on- are disillusioning. One visits Greece in its many parts with him; one listens in on chats with chance acquaintances; one sees behind the scenes in tourist traps and paradises. But oddly enough, despite prejudice in its favor, one is rarely lured.

Publisher: Knopf