C. W. ANDERSON'S FAVORITE HORSE STORIES by C. W.-Ed. Anderson

C. W. ANDERSON'S FAVORITE HORSE STORIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Despite the double designation, these are not all Anderson's; rather this is an anthology of personal recollections of famous horsemen and horse lovers, with some fiction and several poems. Each piece is briefly introduced by the editor. In John Taintor Foote's ""Ole Man Sanford"" a fine old southern gentleman refuses to allow his horses to be doped before a race, although the stablemen assure him it is common practice; Eddie Arcaro's recollections of Whirlaway's win at the Kentucky Derby defends the use of the single blinker. Will James, Anderson himself and others add a variety of experiences; one, ""The Look of Eagles,"" is a real clinker (see p. 890, J-322). The contributors share a common belief in the intelligence of the horse, but it is Joe Palmer in ""Horses Are Like Some People"" who avers near-human perception, concluding that Sands of Pleasure ""proved himself to have about the same judgment as a losing horse player, which rated him close up behind the chimpanzee, and possibly ahead of the dog.

Pub Date: Sept. 29th, 1967
Publisher: Dutton