An important, engaging introduction to a modern zoo, its dedicated staff, and the fascinating animals in its care.

BRIDGE TO THE WILD

BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE ZOO

Targeting young readers as “the next generation of conservationists,” O’Connell shares observations, research, and photographs (taken with Rodwell, her husband) from a week spent with the animals and keepers at Zoo Atlanta.

Scientist O’Connell’s field work with elephants in Namibia has engendered several popular works, including Sibert honoree, co-authored by Donna M. Jackson, The Elephant Scientist (2011). Here, she unfurls her day-by-day, behind-the-scenes experiences at the zoo. She observes elephants, pandas, and the large populations of gorillas and orangutans, all under the guidance of mammal curator Rebecca Snyder. Other keepers introduce her to their work with reptiles and birds, and she accompanies the zoo’s vet on her rounds. In addition to presenting absorbing facts about pandas, Komodo dragons, lion tamarins, and other species, O’Connell acquaints readers with scientific information and methodology. She explains the significance of dominance hierarchies, parenting behaviors, the sensory adaptations of reptiles, and much more, and she introduces types of data sheets used to observe animals. O’Connell presents the modern zoo in a clear light, acknowledging the challenges of replicating favorable conditions for the social, physical, and reproductive health of the exhibited animals. Her final day at Zoo Atlanta occurs on Endangered Species Day, affording an apt backdrop for highlighting the severe threats posed by global habitat degradation and poaching.

An important, engaging introduction to a modern zoo, its dedicated staff, and the fascinating animals in its care. (bibliography, sources, index) (Nonfiction. 9-13)

Pub Date: Aug. 2, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-544-27739-7

Page Count: 208

Publisher: HMH Books

Review Posted Online: June 1, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2016

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A detail-rich picture book best for readers who enjoy nonfiction and are interested in history or science.

COUNTING THE STARS

THE STORY OF KATHERINE JOHNSON, NASA MATHEMATICIAN

This biography of renowned mathematician Katherine Johnson featuring illustrations by Colón aims for elementary-age readers.

Cline-Ransome (Finding Langston, 2018, etc.) traces Johnson’s love of math, curiosity about the world, and studiousness from her early entry to school through her help sending a man into space as a human computer at NASA. The text is detailed and lengthy, between one and four paragraphs of fairly small text on each spread. Many biographies of black achievers during segregation focus on society’s limits and the subject’s determination to reach beyond them. This book takes a subtler approach, mentioning segregation only once (at her new work assignment, “she ignored the stares and the COLORED GIRLS signs on the bathroom door and the segregated cafeteria”) and the glass ceiling for women twice in a factual tone as potential obstacles that did not stop Johnson. Her work is described in the context of the space race, which helps to clarify the importance of her role. Colón’s signature soft, textured illustrations evoke the time period and Johnson’s feeling of wonder about the world, expressed in the refrain, “Why? What? How?” The text moves slowly and demands a fairly high comprehension level (e.g., “it was the job of these women computers to double-check the engineers’ data, develop complex equations, and analyze the numbers”). An author’s note repeats much of the text, adding quotes from Johnson and more details about her more recent recognition.

A detail-rich picture book best for readers who enjoy nonfiction and are interested in history or science. (Picture book/biography. 9-12)

Pub Date: Oct. 8, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5344-0475-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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A coherent if unexceptional overview of the subject given a solid boost by the visuals.

EXPLORING SPACE

FROM GALILEO TO THE MARS ROVER AND BEYOND

Finely detailed cutaway views of spacecraft and satellites launch a broad account of space exploration’s past, present, and near future.

Jenkins begins with the journey of Voyager I, currently the “most distant man-made object ever,” then goes back to recap the history of astronomy, the space race, and the space-shuttle program. He goes on to survey major interplanetary probes and the proliferating swarm of near-Earth satellites, then closes with reflections on our current revived interest in visiting Mars and a brief mention of a proposed “space elevator.” This is all familiar territory, at least to well-read young skywatchers and would-be astronauts, and despite occasional wry observations (“For longer stays [in space], things to consider include staying fit and healthy, keeping clean, and not going insane”) it reads more like a digest than a vivid, ongoing story. Biesty’s eye for exact, precise detail is well in evidence in the illustrations, though, and if one spread of generic residents of the International Space Station is the only place his human figures aren’t all white and male, at least he offers riveting depictions of space gear and craft with every last scientific instrument and structural element visible and labeled.

A coherent if unexceptional overview of the subject given a solid boost by the visuals. (index, timeline, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 10-13)

Pub Date: June 13, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-7636-8931-5

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: March 6, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2017

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