IF YOU CAN'T SAY SOMETHING NICE by Calvin Trillin

IF YOU CAN'T SAY SOMETHING NICE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The number of Trillin devotees has been increasing with each subsequent volume of his collected humorous essays and columns (American Fried, 1974; Alice, Let's Eat, 1978; Uncivil Liberties, 1982; etc.). This present collection, culled mostly from pieces that appeared originally in The Nation, should swell the ranks of Trillin-aficionados still further. Trillin is not afraid to tackle some of the burning issues of the day. He speculates, for example, on ""What ever happened to 'chicken à la king?',"" and ""Who was the California woman Ronald Reagan insisted always picked up her welfare check in a Cadillac and, more importantly, what has happened to her of late?"" (Reagan comes in for some pointed barbs here, along with the ""glitz-hounds"" celebrated in the pages of Vanity Fair.) Trillin also wonders how Imelda Marcos' 2,700 pair of shoes could have been broken in without the use of political prisoners. And readers will be charmed by the author's Aunt Rosie, the doyenne of the ""Jell-O Mold Rangers,"" and her husband, Uncle Harry, who is somehow convinced Columbus discovered America by landing at the corner of Eleventh and Walnut in downtown Kansas City. Humor with an often bracingly thought-provoking aftertaste that's downright addictive.

Pub Date: Oct. 23rd, 1987
Publisher: Ticknor & Fields/Houghton Mifflin