THE RIGHT TO BEAR ARMS by Carl Bakal

THE RIGHT TO BEAR ARMS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The issue of firearms control has become even more controversial since the assassination of President Kennedy. Bakal leaps into the fray on the side of those who believe the Second Amendment (the ""right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed"") does not restrict government's right to regulate the importation, manufacture, sale and possession of firearms in America, and that regulation is imperative. From periodicals, books, statistical studies, and first-hand research he has assembled the arguments on both sides: anecdotes of bizarre hunting accidents, comparisons of crime statistics, the pros and cons of self-defense and gun suicides, the history of government subsidy of the rifleman's arts, conspiracy theories, and extracts from ""gunsport"" magazines and sales materials playing up the benefits and pleasures of guns and decrying the onerousness of regulation. Parts of his material are carefully reasoned and quite convincing but other parts are emotional appeals indicating an anti-Goldwater bias. According to Bakal, the National Rifle Association is somehow the most effective of brainwashing organizations: membership in it not only colors the thinking of many Congressmen but also taints the judgment of men who hold responsible positions in institutions such as the National Safety Council. It is true that gun-control proposals have had a hard time in legislative halls. The voters who read this book will come to a great deal of material to consider, some of it obfuscatory, most of it shocking, all of it important.

Pub Date: July 25th, 1966
Publisher: McGraw-Hill