STARS FELL ON ALABAMA by Carl Carmer

STARS FELL ON ALABAMA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

What Cable did for Louisiana, Carmer has done for Alabama in this extraordinary book. Fascinating reading -- and with the Scottsboro Case centering attention on Alabama, it comes at a good time for stimulating live interest. One gets a strange, conflicting, conglomerate mass of evidence -- the picture of a state as far removed from our eastern seaboard civilization as the African jungle. A state that combines the gentle traditions of southern hospitality, the crudities of the folk of back mountain districts, the primitiveness of the jungle negro, the ruthlessness of the Klu Klux Klan, modern version, the childlike simplicity of a race which has developed its own folk lore and folk music and folk dancing. Along with this he has given enough of the actual folk songs and tales to build a new facet of Americana. Duels -- lynchings -- voodoo -- exist side by side, with proud traditions of descendants of Spanish conquistadors, gay creoles, enigmatic Cajans, remnants of Indian tribes, descendants of Scotch and French settlers. A goldmine of information, graphically presented. Sell to any customers interested in Americana -- current and past. And to anyone who has imagination enough to get the thrill out of discoveries near at hand.

Pub Date: July 1st, 1934
ISBN: 081731072X
Publisher: Farrar & Rinehart