FOUR HUNDRED MILLION CUSTOMERS by Carl Crow
Kirkus Star

FOUR HUNDRED MILLION CUSTOMERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

I loved it, and it seems to me it has many more possibilities of a market than the limitations of the defined subject would indicate. The sub-title reads -- The Experiences -- Some Happy,--Some Sad -- of an American in China and What They Taught Him. An advertising man goes to China to sell the Chinese anything and everything, and he finds out, a bit at a time, that it is not a question of 400,000,000 customers, ready-made, but that there is tradition, strong prejudice, definite likes and dislikes, illiteracy, poverty, inaccessibility -- a paltry few of the hurdles to be taken. With humor and a keen sense of the rights of individuals and an eagerness to understand the people with whom he is dealing, he accepts defeat and success as he goes, lives and lets live. There's enough sound common sense and keen appraisal of the situation to make the book invaluable for business men and industrialists reaching out for the Chinese market. And for people who enjoy keen sidelights on foreign races and ways of life, this holds entertainment and education as well. It's attractive in format, with amusing drawings by G. Saponknikoff.

Pub Date: Sept. 8th, 1937
Publisher: Harper