THE BLACK PRESS AND THE STRUGGLE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS by Carl Senna

THE BLACK PRESS AND THE STRUGGLE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

Age Range: 14 & up
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KIRKUS REVIEW

 From the appearance of Freedom's Journal in 1827 to what Senna sees as today's ``integration of black journalists into the mainstream of American journalism,'' the battles for emancipation, and then for civil rights, have been the black press's chief raison d`àtre, the battle for commercial viability its Waterloo. Senna's account of prominent journalists, from Frederick Douglass and Ida B. Wells to Carl Rowan, and generally evanescent publications (Ebony and others from John H. Johnson's publishing empire are exceptions) suggests the integral role that press has played in our social and political history. Unfortunately, the book is superficially researched (endnotes cite only secondary sources plus a 1969 Britannica article), and heavily padded with general history; despite frequent quotes, it lacks all but the barest hint of the special flavor of black journalism. This may have some appeal for its unusual focus but, if possible, steer readers to Wolseley's imposing Black Press, USA (Iowa State University Press, second editon 1990). Perfunctory, dark b&w illustrations; bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. YA)

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1993
ISBN: 0-531-11036-2
Page count: 160pp
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15th, 1993




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