THE ORIGINS OF RACES by Carleton Coon
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THE ORIGINS OF RACES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A work of Herculean size and significance, Carleton Coons' The Origins Of Races should prove one of the anthropological landmarks of the decade. The scope is as astonishing as the scholarship, the organization of material clear and conclusive; an exhaustive exploration into the pathways of human evolution which uses as many extra-departmental disciplines as was found necessary to elaborate his thesis. Simply put, it is Coons' belief that over half a million years ago man was a single species, Homo erectus, which in time divided into 5 geographic races or subspecies, which in turn then evolved into present day Homo sapiens, once again dividing 5 ways as each subspecies, living in its own territory, passed a critical threshold from a more brutal to a more sapient state, with 3 of the races embracing the Eurasiatic line (Australoid, Mongoloid & Caucasoid), the remaining 2 covering the Congoid and Ternefine-Tangier line, i.e. Africa. Genetic theory, zoogeography, primate behavior, physiology, social anthropology, archaeological findings of the Pleistocene period, the mechanisms of early adaptation to heat, cold and altitude, the latest discoveries relating to fossil apes and australopithecines, the possibility that races of man are even older than known Homo specimens, survival of the fittest as either cultural or physiological, parallel evolution vs peripheral gene flow- all these and countless other subjects, documentations, scraps of data are examined, catalogued, interpreted with a masterful display of both detail and design. For every library, it is a must.

Pub Date: Oct. 15th, 1962
Publisher: Knopf