THE LIFE AND TIMES OF TARQUIN THE ETRUSCAN by Carlo Maria Franzero

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF TARQUIN THE ETRUSCAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A history and a biography, of which such classic episodes as Romulus and Romus, the rape of the Sabine women, the rape of Lucrece and Horatius at the bridge are a part, is presented to explain why Rome so utterly destroyed so much of the Etruscan civilization and how, in turn, Rome itself fell to the Gauls. This account of Etruria begins 5 centuries before Rome was founded, shows the development of its aristocratic republics, of its viniculture, mines, coinage, and public works, and follows the rise of Tarquinius Priscus once he had settled in Rome under King Ancus. From his rule to that of his successor, Servius, and to Tarquin the Proud comes the great progress of Rome until Lucius Brutus, who had been declassed, leads the rebellion against the Etruscan line which eventually led to its extermination. With copious detail about religious, political, social, military and economic structures, against the findings of modern archeology, this presents a strong case for the importance of Etruscan influence on Italian history and offers an interesting panorama of pre-Christian centuries.

Pub Date: Feb. 6th, 1960
Publisher: John Day