THE NEW MOTHER SYNDROME: Coping With Post-partum Stress and Depression by Carol Dix

THE NEW MOTHER SYNDROME: Coping With Post-partum Stress and Depression

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Despite a tendency to over-diagnose (does everyone get post-partum depression?), this guide to common stresses offers real help for new mothers. Dix reckons that one out of every eight women are affected by postpartum depression, and names it as a common cause of marital discord and divorce. This may be hyperbole, but certainly many women suffer from strong emotional reactions to birth-giving. Dix identifies ""two principal syndromes of PPD"": the blues, which is ""a mild, short-lived syndrome,"" and puerperal psychosis, a very severe problem. Anxiety and agitation are common characteristics of both. After defining the problem, Dix explains why it arises: role changes and physical/hormonal factors are at work. She then looks at special problems of working mothers (choices, more role questions), and later turns to ""A Game Plan for Survival."" Dix will be too enthusiastic for some on medical questions (she okays hormone therapy and much medical intervention in childbirth). Nevertheless, this offers finn you-are-not-alone support, and some practical suggestions on avoiding or ameliorating the problem.

Pub Date: Sept. 27th, 1985
Publisher: Doubleday