THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN THE WORLD by Carol Farley

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN THE WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The search for ""the most important thing in the world"" ought to lead somewhere exciting, but the catch is that Miss Ernestine Fee is using the question to find out which of her relatives is worthy of inheriting her money and the two kids she brings along to judge her cross-country search have already won an ""honesty"" contest by answering the same question. (They both replied ""myself."") Unfortunately Miss Fee is more than capable of making up her own mind so young Roxann and Marvin are left with no visible function except observing the obvious hypocrisy of a string of family stereotypes. The winner, a non-related black farmer Ernestine meets along the way, stands out not so much for the quality of his answer (dignity) but rather as the only serious character in a group that's often too pitiful to be comic. Most kids will recognize the unacknowledged arrogance of Miss Fee's quest, and they'll suspect that the outcome is rigged even before the last contestant is introduced.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1974
Page count: 133pp
Publisher: Franklin Watts