THE STORYBOOK COOKBOOK by Carol MacGregor

THE STORYBOOK COOKBOOK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The idea of a collection of recipes for foods which figure in children's classics has promise, but the development has some curious inconsistencies which subvert the original purpose. Pinocchio's treasured egg hatched as he was about to pop it into the pan; yours won't (why?) so you can go on to make a poached egg; Hans Brinker bought his waffles (with hard-earned money), and Hannah's (Thee, ***) came from the pretzel man--you'll have to put yours together from scratch (why?); in Swiss Family Robinson, Jack had a struggle to get the lobster his mother threw into the pot--you'll use canned lobster meat (for a rather refined bisque); ditto for the pumpkin that goes into the pie that Ma baked in Little House in the Big Woods Except for Chincoteague Pot Pie and Mrs. Gilligan's Griddle Bread (Roller Skates), the dishes bear little resemblance to the originals either in the circumstance or the manner of their making. (Also, considerable patience and expertise is required, unusual in the girl under twelve to whom the format would appeal.) We've left our favorite gaffe for last: you can avoid Jo March's disaster in the kitchen ""if you follow the recipe carefully.

Pub Date: Aug. 18th, 1967
Publisher: Doubleday