A look at an important world culture that will show kids just how similar they are to others around the world.

READ REVIEW

If You Were Me and Lived in...Greece

A CHILD'S INTRODUCTION TO CULTURE AROUND THE WORLD

An overview of Greek life and culture that offers readers a virtual tour through the country, as told from a child’s perspective.

In this latest installment of her children’s book series, Roman heads to Greece to take her readers on a whirlwind trip through its young narrator’s homeland. Much like her previous books, which focused on Hungary, France, Mexico, and other lands, this one presents an engaging look at a foreign country while also considering topics that kids will find relatable. The book opens with a map of Greece, and the narrator points out where it’s located on the globe. The narrator then describes Athens, the capital city, noting its vital role in the creation of democracy, as well as how Plato and Aristotle taught there and continue to have an enduring legacy. From there, the book moves on to everyday life, covering common Greek first names, the terms for various family members, and important tourist attractions. It also notes important moments in Greek history, such as the establishment of the Olympics, which may help kids understand why Greece is a particularly important country. The narrator describes iconic Greek foods in detail: “Tzatziki is a tangy sauce made from yogurt and cucumber to put on roasted lamb….You will always ask to finish your meal with loukoumades (loo-ka-mad-es), which is a doughnut covered with honey and cinnamon.” These descriptions, along with the helpful pronunciation key at the back (and phonetics scattered throughout the text), will make it easy for kids to imagine how the foods taste as they also add to their vocabularies. Overall, Roman’s engaging, concise writing style, combined with colorful illustrations and photos, provides an easy-to-follow summary of Greek culture. It’s an excellent place for kids to start if they’re researching Greece for a school project or if parents want to help them understand the similarities and differences between American and Greek societies.

A look at an important world culture that will show kids just how similar they are to others around the world.

Pub Date: Sept. 23, 2014

ISBN: 978-1497526181

Page Count: 30

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: Jan. 6, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2015

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Playful, engaging, and full of opportunities for empathy—a raucous storytime hit.

THERE'S A MONSTER IN YOUR BOOK

From the There’s a…in Your Book series

Readers try to dislodge a monster from the pages of this emotive and interactive read-aloud.

“OH NO!” the story starts. “There’s a monster in your book!” The blue, round-headed monster with pink horns and a pink-tipped tail can be seen cheerfully munching on the opening page. “Let’s try to get him out,” declares the narrator. Readers are encouraged to shake, tilt, and spin the book around, while the monster careens around an empty background looking scared and lost. Viewers are exhorted to tickle the monster’s feet, blow on the page, and make a really loud noise. Finally, shockingly, it works: “Now he’s in your room!” But clearly a monster in your book is safer than a monster in your room, so he’s coaxed back into the illustrations and lulled to sleep, curled up under one page and cuddling a bit of another like a child with their blankie. The monster’s entirely cute appearance and clear emotional reactions to his treatment add to the interactive aspect, and some young readers might even resist the instructions to avoid hurting their new pal. Children will be brought along on the monster’s journey, going from excited, noisy, and wiggly to calm and steady (one can hope).

Playful, engaging, and full of opportunities for empathy—a raucous storytime hit. (Picture book. 2-7)

Pub Date: Sept. 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-5247-6456-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: June 5, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2017

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The book is perfect for read-alouds, with occasional, often onomatopoeic Spanish words such as “quiquiriquí,” “tacatac” and...

WAITING FOR THE BIBLIOBURRO

Inspired by Colombian librarian Luis Soriano Bohórquez, Brown’s latest tells of a little girl whose wish comes true when a librarian and two book-laden burros visit her remote village.

Ana loves to read and spends all of her free time either reading alone or to her younger brother. She knows every word of the one book she owns. Although she uses her imagination to create fantastical bedtime tales for her brother, she really wants new books to read. Everything changes when a traveling librarian and his two donkeys, Alfa and Beto, arrive in the village. Besides loaning books to the children until his next visit, the unnamed man also reads them stories and teaches the younger children the alphabet. When Ana suggests that someone write a book about the traveling library, he encourages her to complete this task herself. After she reads her library books, Ana writes her own story for the librarian and gives it to him upon his reappearance—and he makes it part of his biblioburro collection. Parra’s colorful folk-style illustrations of acrylics on board bring Ana’s real and imaginary worlds to life. This is a child-centered complement to Jeanette Winter’s Biblioburro (2010), which focuses on Soriano.

The book is perfect for read-alouds, with occasional, often onomatopoeic Spanish words such as “quiquiriquí,” “tacatac” and “iii-aah” adding to the fun.   (author’s note, glossary of Spanish terms) (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: July 12, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-58246-353-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Tricycle

Review Posted Online: June 6, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2011

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