An engrossing and personal look at the evolution of the field of nursing.

THE NAKED CITY

TRUE STORIES AND REVELATIONS ABOUT THE REAL LIFE WORLD OF NURSING FROM A HEALTHCARE PIONEER AND AUTHOR OF THE BESTSELLING 'TEXTBOOK OF BASIC NURSING'

A nurse and educator recounts a vibrant career in this memoir featuring colorful vignettes.

When a friend and colleague suggested to Rosdahl that she write down the stories from her long and varied nursing career, the author was skeptical that her life would be of interest to readers. But she took up the challenge and gathered a wealth of anecdotes, case studies, and vivid history for an eclectic and compelling narrative of a career in a dynamic field. Author Joan Holman’s foreword gives an overview of Rosdahl’s pioneering work in the education of nurses, including writing a bestselling nursing text and introducing measurable learning objectives that continue to be used today. The bones of this brief biography are fleshed out enthusiastically in Rosdahl’s chronologically organized series of sketches that follow. Starting her career at age 16 in the 1950s, the author broke barriers in nursing and nursing education, including working for 40 cents an hour as the only Protestant nursing assistant in a Roman Catholic hospital, overcoming institutional resistance to become the first nonteaching high school counselor in Minnesota, and launching one of the first accredited practical nursing programs in that state. Stories such as “Being an “O.W.,” about the former stigma of out-of-wedlock pregnancy; “Heating Up Pizza,” in which student nurses heat leftovers in an operating room autoclave; and “Women in the Marching Band,” about gender barriers for female musicians, ground the narrative in Rosdahl’s personal experiences. The result is an accessible history of modern nursing, narrated with the concise clarity of a born teacher who can’t resist sharing an intriguing fact. The author’s tone is charmingly candid and coolly competent, whether she is flipping a would-be attacker on his back or handling a supervisor’s prim sputtering about an instructor’s pregnancy with a terse “I think I will just wait. I believe it will go away.” Occasionally, this frankness becomes a bit off-putting, as when a frequently pregnant, impoverished woman’s underwear is described as “a dirty, greasy bra.” It is also disappointing to find quotes from Wikipedia in the text rather than better researched information. Still, overall, the absorbing book is a warm and fitting tribute to the nurses and nursing educators to whom it is dedicated.

An engrossing and personal look at the evolution of the field of nursing.

Pub Date: Dec. 14, 2020

ISBN: 979-8-57-951805-7

Page Count: 308

Publisher: Bunker Hills Media

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2021

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A conversational, pleasurable look into McConaughey’s life and thought.

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GREENLIGHTS

All right, all right, all right: The affable, laconic actor delivers a combination of memoir and self-help book.

“This is an approach book,” writes McConaughey, adding that it contains “philosophies that can be objectively understood, and if you choose, subjectively adopted, by either changing your reality, or changing how you see it. This is a playbook, based on adventures in my life.” Some of those philosophies come in the form of apothegms: “When you can design your own weather, blow in the breeze”; “Simplify, focus, conserve to liberate.” Others come in the form of sometimes rambling stories that never take the shortest route from point A to point B, as when he recounts a dream-spurred, challenging visit to the Malian musician Ali Farka Touré, who offered a significant lesson in how disagreement can be expressed politely and without rancor. Fans of McConaughey will enjoy his memories—which line up squarely with other accounts in Melissa Maerz’s recent oral history, Alright, Alright, Alright—of his debut in Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused, to which he contributed not just that signature phrase, but also a kind of too-cool-for-school hipness that dissolves a bit upon realizing that he’s an older guy on the prowl for teenage girls. McConaughey’s prep to settle into the role of Wooderson involved inhabiting the mind of a dude who digs cars, rock ’n’ roll, and “chicks,” and he ran with it, reminding readers that the film originally had only three scripted scenes for his character. The lesson: “Do one thing well, then another. Once, then once more.” It’s clear that the author is a thoughtful man, even an intellectual of sorts, though without the earnestness of Ethan Hawke or James Franco. Though some of the sentiments are greeting card–ish, this book is entertaining and full of good lessons.

A conversational, pleasurable look into McConaughey’s life and thought.

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-593-13913-4

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Oct. 27, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2020

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A lively and thoughtful memoir that, one hopes, will inspire readers to pursue activism in every realm of society.

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PERSIST

The Massachusetts senator and financial reformer recounts several of her good fights over the years.

Famous for being chided for “persisting” on the Senate floor, Warren is nearly a byword for the application of an unbending, if usually polite, feminism to the corridors of power. Though she has a schoolmarm-ish air—and indeed taught school for much of her life—she gladly owns up to liking a beer or two and enjoying a good brawl, and she’s a scrapper with a long memory. In 2008, when she shopped a proposal to found a federal agency that “could act as a watchdog to make sure that consumers weren’t getting cheated by financial institutions,” she encountered a congressman who “laughed in my face.” She doesn’t reveal his name, but you can bet he crosses the hall when she’s coming the other way. Warren does name other names, especially Donald Trump, who, with Republicans on the Hill, accomplished only one thing, namely “a $2 trillion tax cut that mostly benefited rich people.” Now that the Democrats are in power, the author reckons that the time is ripe to shake off the Trump debacle and build “a nation that works, not just for the rich and powerful but for everyone.” She identifies numerous areas that need immediate attention, from financial reform to bringing more women into the workplace and mandating equal pay for equal work. Warren premises some of these changes on increased taxes on the rich, happily citing a billionaire well known for insider trading, who complained of her, “This is the fucking American dream she is shitting on.” The author reverts to form: “Oh dear. Did I hit a nerve?” Warren’s common-sensical proposals on housing, infrastructure development, and civil rights merit attention, and her book makes for a sometimes-funny, sometimes–sharp-tongued pleasure.

A lively and thoughtful memoir that, one hopes, will inspire readers to pursue activism in every realm of society.

Pub Date: May 4, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-250-79924-1

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Metropolitan/Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: May 2, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2021

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