AMERICAN INDIAN FOOD AND LORE by Carolyn Niethammer

AMERICAN INDIAN FOOD AND LORE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The title is deceptive, for the author concerns herself exclusively with foods of the southwest, a land that appears to the untutored eye so arid that even ""a crow has to pack a canteen when he flies over there."" But the Navajos and Apaches, among others, used to thrive on mesquite bread, yucca hash, prickly pear juice, agave nut butter, pinyon soup, plus the basic corn or bean mush -- and some still do. The book includes a comprehensive survey of basic desert foods and recipes, including pictures and descriptions of the various plants for the intrepid food-gatherer, in case the energy and inflation crises turn from push to shove and we find ourselves back where we started from. Even for the sanguine, however, this book has a value both for what it teaches us about the incredible patience and ingenuity of America's original citizens in collecting and storing their often-scarce nourishment, plus intriguing information on primitive cures -- such as the acorn tea used to remedy bad-smelling feet!

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1974
Publisher: Macmillan