I HAVE FOUGHT THE GOOD FIGHT by Carter Wilson

I HAVE FOUGHT THE GOOD FIGHT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This explicit portrait of a lady growing old in an alien world, a world which reflects her own loss of love, mercy and decency, has a peculiar American application. For Bernice Sessions was of the sunny era of privilege in the American well-to-do Twenties--beautiful, accomplished, desired. The loss of family money and the resultant change of style came as a surprise to Bernice and her widowed mother, Dolly, but although modeling was not a career one would have imagined, Bernice's soft femininity was in demand until the era of Rosie the Riveter, when work in Washington, a grooming book, and a greeting card business seemed to point a predestined path to ""fighting the good fight."" But then there was the fight with a world in which she was no longer sure of status. Bernice, increasingly bitter in her fifties, is soured by the aridity of a nearly lifelong attachment to an equally selfish childhood friend, becomes ruthless with those around her, sinks almost abruptly into bankruptcy, piteous thefts and tortuous recriminations.... As a portrait, curiously lean and spare with the subject carrying its own pathos. A grievous prospect--viewed with energy and originality.

Pub Date: Sept. 27th, 1967
Publisher: Lippincott