GINNIE AND THE WEDDING BELLS by Catherine Woolley

GINNIE AND THE WEDDING BELLS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The bells are ringing--will Ginnie make it? First there's the black eye (from a snowball) that eliminates her as a junior bridesmaid; then there's a cat who's anticipating, a dress still to buy, an arithmetic test to take, a suit still at the cleaner's, a lost dental bridge, a flat tire, a locket left behind, and bad weather threatening to ground all planes. Airborne at last, Ginnie realizes that she has forgotten The Dress; more frantic rushing from store to store wedged between prenuptial celebrations and sightseeing in Nantucket. Two hours to go--a dress; one hour--bridesmaid Margo turns her ankle; a half hour -- Margo on crutches, Ginnie into the breach: Dum, dum, de-dum --Ginnie coming down the aisle, ""Knees shaking"" (but no more black eye). Ginnie's wardrobe (e.g. ""blue taffetta with a bouffant skirt"") is hopelessly dated; so is the story-- and it can't quite be dismissed as girlish daydreaming because of an undercurrent of affectation (""cheap"" smells) and smugness (endless details of gracious living).

Pub Date: Aug. 16th, 1967
Publisher: Morrow