THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF CECIL B. DEMILLE by Cecil B. DeMille

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF CECIL B. DEMILLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The work of six years before his death, DeMille's life story is here edited and completed by Donald Hayne who had been closely associated with him. Koury's Yes, Mr. DeMille (Putnam, P. 397) covers much of the same ground particularly in the picture-making department, and gives perhaps a brighter word portrait of the man, but it lacks the definitive characteristics that are evident here. This first person chronicle turns the pages on the early connections with the theater through both his father, devout but drama minded, and his mother, for whom the stage offered a living when she was widowed; on the switch to moving pictures and the beginnings of the de Mille legend in Hollywood; on his happy marriage; on his many friends and foes, the stars he spotted and groomed; on the movies he made from silent to talking, from one-reelers to the biblical spectaculars, from the early crudities to the devices perfected through the years. There is much of picture financing, organizational changeovers, relations with religious bodies and cinematic affiliations -- amicable and otherwise; there are, of course, names and names- from Belasco and Sothern to Yul Brynner and Charlton Heston. For the student of moving pictures this is authentic material; for the movie-goer it is a comprehensive tour behind-scenes with an expert guide.

Pub Date: Nov. 9th, 1959
Publisher: Prentice-Hall