WOODY'S WONDERFUL WORLD by Cecile Curtis

WOODY'S WONDERFUL WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The spirit of Thornton Burgess suffuses this story of a mistreated mouse and cancels out a handsomely designed and drawn visit to the zoo. Woody, the field mouse, scorned by his fellows because of a distinctive white patch on top of his head, escapes into the wonderful world of the zoo. ""Perhaps here I can find some friends who won't make fun of me,"" he thinks. On his tour of the premises he mistakes Grumpy the giraffe for a clump of trees, plays follow the leader with two ring-tailed coatimundis from South America--and enjoys the universal admiration for his distinguishing spot. Seeking a ""small corner that was warm and snug and dry,"" he settles down at last in the comfortable quarters of Guy the gorilla. In the author's words, and in their own words, the animals are cartoon characters; in the terra cotta and black engravings, they are imaginative and expressive figures: Woody riding on the horn of the rhinoceros of paddling across the pond in a Dixie cup shares the mouse mystique. Better text next time.

Pub Date: Feb. 24th, 1967
Publisher: McGraw-Hill