THE KITCHEN REVOLUTION COOKBOOK by Ceil Dyer

THE KITCHEN REVOLUTION COOKBOOK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Just what is supposed to be revolutionary about this number is never made clear. After some introductory remarks about the current crop of gadgets and ""how we really eat in these fast-paced, ever-changing days,"" Dyer gets down to the sorts of things that can be found in dozens of existing cookbooks--stirfry dishes, pâtÉs, filled crepes, slow-cooked meals, sandwiches, and various standard menu-categories. The recipes range from okay (fettucini with zucchini and ham, black-bean soup, crabmeat and fish salad) to horrendous (cream-cheese ice cream with honey yogurt and orange-pineapple yogurt, a gelatin-based ""ham pâtÉ"" with sweet mixed pickles). Bottled sauces, canned pineapple, and prepared mixed seasonings are used with a heavy hand, and there is much burbling about how timely everything is (""Wonder of wonders--deep-down, slow-cooked flavor is back. . .""). Skippable.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1980
Publisher: Macmillan