AMERICAN LABOR LEADERS by Charles A. Madison

AMERICAN LABOR LEADERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The growth and development of the labor movement defined through the personalties of the outstanding leaders. These are interesting and provocative biographical sketches, wide in scope and encompassing those leaders who have influenced the thinking and action of unions from the early days of William Sylvis, labor's first champion, down through Gompers to Green, Hutcheson, John Mitchell and John Lewis (miners' advocates), Dubinsky, Hill-man, Whitney (railroaders), Haywood, euther and Bridges. The author tells of strikes and their outcomes in the growing strength of the unions, of the gains, the setbacks. In the first half of the book, the author seems objective and fair in his analysis; then there is evident a slight leaning of bias against those leaders who have tried to clean communism out of the ranks, while for Bridges he has only unadulterated praise. This unbalance some-how weakens the total effect of the book, though it has great merit and-with reservations and understanding should be a valuable addition to the history of the movement and the force of personal power.

Pub Date: May 24th, 1950
Publisher: Harper