GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY by Charles Frankel

GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

More than an anthology, yet something less than a history, this selection of the writings of American philosophers provides an excellent picture of the growth and change in our thought between the Civil War and World War II. The author begins with a long introduction, discussing the development of pragmatism and modern political liberalism during that time. He shows too how American philosophers wrestled with mechanistic science to form new and positive social ideas. Then he allows the writers---Wright, Peirce, James, Royce, Santayana, Dewey, Perry, Lewis, and Cohen---to speak for themselves. Excerpts from Santayana's Life of Reason or James' Varieties of Religious Experience, for instance, give succinct insights into these philosophers' thoughts. Biographical material is provided on each. The total effect is highly satisfactory. Although a difficult collection to assimilate quickly, this is one to provide more than surface knowledge of a vital American age.

Pub Date: Jan. 11th, 1959
Publisher: George Braziller