THE NEW OXFORD HISTORY OF MUSIC, III by

THE NEW OXFORD HISTORY OF MUSIC, III

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The New Oxford History of Music is not a revision of, but rather a replacement for, the older work, say its authors. It is a modern treatment of a subject on which much light has been shed since the original series appeared (1901-05). This Volume III covers the Ars Nova and the Renaissance, from 1300 to 1540, an age of music ""remarkable not only for promise but also for achievement."" Substantially illustrated with clearly notated musical examples, this is a prize for the library of a serious student, but it is not so ponderous that it cannot give pleasure to those who enjoy for enjoyment's sake the motets, chansons, masses songs, and dance forms characteristic of this important period. Opera-lovers, too, will find it of value. The development of music as an inter-related facet of human culture and activity is stressed, in much the same way that other topics of study are handled today. It has few English literary mannerisms, so it should be completely acceptable to American readers.

Pub Date: Sept. 8th, 1960
Publisher: Oxford University Press