Underserved by its title, this cookbook will be a game-changer for cooks hungry for quick, easy ways to create practical,...

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Healthy Meat and Potatoes

According to cooking-show host Knight and his son, there’s no need to give up old favorites in pursuit of healthy eating if cooks use these simple, healthful recipes.

Using novel cooking techniques and ingredient tweaks, the Knights adapt traditional favorites to contemporary dietary trends (less fat and salt), putting rich fare—such as chicken cordon bleu, Peking duck, bourbon-stuffed filet mignon, roast stuffed veal, chili, etc.—back on the healthy table. Knight explains how to make a low-sodium stock from fresh vegetables and meat and how to create a roux that can thicken other sauces. Though many recipes employ the waterless cookware that Knight started his career by selling, experienced cooks should be able to adapt regular stovetop cookware (cast iron, etc.) so as to avoid investing in new pots and pans. Under Knight’s careful guidance, even beginners should soon feel confident, especially after he offers insight into how kitchen mistakes can happen. He warns, for example, that in making the lobster bisque, readers should “please read the entire recipe before beginning” and “keep your face away from the flames.” As the title suggests, meat and potatoes get star treatment—including over a dozen tuber recipes—but other vegetables get loving treatment as well: pesto, Italian-style spinach, mustard greens, squash, etc. The six-recipe dessert section offers treats such as amaretto fruit cake (using a commercially available cake mix) and bread pudding “baked” on the stovetop. Short explanations about why and how good food is created, a detailed index, a metric conversion chart and a detailed list of calories—including where they come from: fat, protein, carbohydrates, cholesterol, sodium, etc.—after every recipe help make this cookbook a lifesaver, perhaps literally.

Underserved by its title, this cookbook will be a game-changer for cooks hungry for quick, easy ways to create practical, healthful and inspired fare.

Pub Date: Feb. 28, 2007

ISBN: 978-1419659669

Page Count: 256

Publisher: BookSurge Publishing

Review Posted Online: Aug. 2, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2013

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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