THE LAST CALL OF MOURNING by Charles L. Grant

THE LAST CALL OF MOURNING

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

If, by mistake, Amtrak drops you off at Oxrun Station, Connecticut, pedal out of town like crazy--which is what Cynthia Yarrow should have done in this third Oxrun horror gala. Cynthia has been away on a trip abroad, but now after a month in increasingly depressing Oxrun, she's determined to be independent of her wealthy family and open a book store. Curiously, her family--hard-line father, mother, and two brothers--doesn't seem to care much anymore, even when she tells them about that gray limousine which appears out of nowhere every now and then to run her down. But perhaps they haven't been well; all have taken a few days' treatment at a new clinic run by the unpleasant Dr. Kraylin, whom Cynthia's mother tries to foist on Cynthia during an oddly ghostly party at the Yarrow home. Then there's the crow with one wing who attacks Cynthia and Ed (a sturdy local sort who proposes)--the crow that won't die, even when battered with an iron club. And what about Mother, who, when cut, won't bleed? Or those two strange deaths (including the secretive family lawyer)? The mysterious fire in the bookstore? And don't forget the fog, wind, and generally unruly weather that rages whenever Cynthia (frequently) takes flight, amid flailing, brake-screeching, and toe-stubbing. With a double-barreled grisly close, this frantic, clammy nonsense--easily the best of Grant's Oxrun-ners--can scare you witless. . . which is the ideal state of mind for optimum enjoyment.

Pub Date: Aug. 24th, 1979
Publisher: Doubleday