THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN LAW by Charles M.-Ed. Haar

THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN LAW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Professor Haar defines his Periclean Age as the period between 1820 and 1860. In analyzing this period, he probes into all the aspects of the practice of law from the formal requirements of the time and the position of the lawyer in the community to the various doctrinal disputes. The material runs from a circular defining the curriculum of a law school to a statement by John Calhoun on his doctrine of nullification. The author has provided introductory material for each of his five topical divisions relating the selections to the era. Nonetheless the work omits much which would be useful in appraising the law in this country as it attempted to free itself from the domination of its English origins. It may be argued that any work which attempts to develop a golden age might be guilty of this in order to achieve the objective intended. However, even those who believe that a search such as this diverts Professor Haar's talents into a somewhat stultifying exercise, still would agree that the collection amasses in one place a good deal of information on this era.

Pub Date: Sept. 30th, 1965
Publisher: Braziller