REVEREND RANDOLLPH AND THE SPLENDID SAMARITAN by Charles Merrill Smith

REVEREND RANDOLLPH AND THE SPLENDID SAMARITAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Last of the late author's stories about Reverend Con Randollph, ex-football star, part-time sleuth and pastor of Chicago's tiny Church of the Good Shepherd (Reverend Randollph and the Unholy Bible, etc.). Chicago's super-rich Jim Trent, whose widely advertised charities have earned him the nickname of the ""Splendid Samaritan,"" has been tortured, killed, and found clutching a bloodied $100 bill. Houston's big-shot lawyer Big Al Evans and Atlanta's real-estate tycoon Everett Stagg have died in the same bizarre way. But it's as if Chicago's police department, in the person of Randollph's friend Lieutenant Mike Casey, has never heard of the computer age, let alone being able to imagine what the media would do with three such spectacular murders. Oblivious of the duplicate killings, Casey flounders around with boring ineptitude until rescued by Randollph's brilliant idea of exploring Trent's early days in the dusty Texas town of Hollyhock Hills, where motive becomes clear and the culprit soon pinpointed. Some only mildly interesting church and police politics and too much dull theology are little help in this harmless but hapless tale.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1986
Publisher: Putnam