LOVE AND THE TWENTIETH VOLUNTEERS by Charles P. Breen

LOVE AND THE TWENTIETH VOLUNTEERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A frenetically loquacious comedy of Modern Times with many good lines and a basically engaging plot in which George Wicker, up to his ears in the American Neuroses, has talked his suburban community into buying a new fire engine. It arrives. It is $55,000 worth of every boy's dream- and too good for Cus Bay. So George and his friends appropriate it, careen around on back roads, and form a new Volunteer Company which barricades itself, and the new engine, in the firehouse, challenging wives, townspeople and society in general to come and get them. It is a semi-legal, successful Revolt of the Downtrodden Male, full of the delights of batching it, learning a whole new technical vocabulary, and the excitements of some wildly mismanaged fires. Much of this is good fun- but it often skates close to real problems, and includes too many varieties of humor, from slapstick to wit, and perhaps simply too many words, to come off altogether. Still, there are moments.

Pub Date: April 7th, 1961
Publisher: Doubleday