THE PASSIONATE PILGRIM by Charles Terrot

THE PASSIONATE PILGRIM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Based on the diary of an ancestor, Sister Sarah Anne Terrot who was one of Florence Nightingale's thirty-eight nurses in the Crimea, this is -- save for the romantic sequences -- true. There's gallantry and drama in the story of Elizabeth Wheeler, the young, impulsive friend of Sarah Anne, who is dedicated to her work and who, with MacLean, the young doctor she loves, fights to give the men food, to clean up the charnel house wards. But Menzies, the doctor in charge, and Florence Nightingale offer obstacles and opposition that lead to Elizabeth's final disgrace. The Lady of the Lamp is revealed without sentimentality, playing a game with officialdom to secure the success of her mission at the expense of loyalty to her nurses, and throughout a cold, practical, expedient administrator. This is certainly the other side of the medal for an historical figure and worthy of note. The story itself is tragic and spirited.

Pub Date: Sept. 14th, 1949
Publisher: Harper