SOMETHING ABOUT A SOLDIER by Charles Willeford

SOMETHING ABOUT A SOLDIER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A down-to-earth autobiography of several years in the life of an Army man in the pre-WW II Philippines. Willeford, who has written a baker's dozen suspense novels, takes us back to an Army that no longer exists, in which he served a stint in the Air Corps, then, after trying to get a job back home in Los Angeles, to which he returned as a member of the Cavalry. Anyone who has ever served in the military, especially overseas, will nod nostalgically at the lurid moments and the colorful parade of characters that somehow are never quite duplicated in the world of the civilian. Willeford's forte is in his descriptions of the down-and-dirty details, whether he's describing why getting bitten by a horse is the worst possible animal bite (the horse never lets go) or why he drew the line at having sex with teen-age Filipino prostitutes (invariably, the performance would take place at the girl's own home, with her parents puttering in the next room and a couple of toddlers playing on the floor). Most soldier's stories derive their sting from wartime thrills and tragedies. Willeford has turned this around and demonstrated that in peace, as in war, the military life brings out the best, the worst, the most humorous, and the most pathetic in men.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1986
Publisher: Random House