THE INSECURITY OF NATIONS by Charles Yost

THE INSECURITY OF NATIONS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

This diagnostic attempt was prompted by ""forty years' exasperation with the fact that statesmen and soldiers persist in pursuing national security by absolute means that on the whole promote insecurity."" Yost suggests that foreign policy is still conducted as crudely as it was in the time of the Greek city states--and, of course, with steadily multiplying dangers. The first section samples the views of artists, politicians, psychologists and experimental scientists like Konrad Lorentz in an effort to pin down the decisive influences on world affairs. Part two is devoted to the ""three great confrontations"" since 1945: in Europe, in Asia, and between ""North and South,"" by which Yost means the present and future antagonisms among so-called developed and underdeveloped regions. The last third of the book attempts to synthesize all this material; it concludes with standard, vaguely encouraging generalities.

Pub Date: Jan. 1st, 1967
Publisher: Praeger