IF HE HOLLERS, LET HIM GO by Chester B. Kimos

IF HE HOLLERS, LET HIM GO

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Another painfully graphic picture of the injustices suffered by Negroes in a first novel in which is painted a far from flattering picture of the American Negro. This might be called a poor man's Richard Wright -- realism, yet, but sex at the vulgar level, lack of sensitivity, perception, maturity in the writer. A young, educated Negro attempts to make an adjustment to war work in a shipyard, against the conflict between Jim Crowism and the rising importance of Negro labor; he falls in love with a ""light Negro"" who can justify the cruelties of the whites and -- almost rejecting her color -- aspires to social equality. High-strung, emotional, the hero returns the insult of the white worker, gets demoted, is challenged by his fiancee to apologise, is trapped in a rape charge -- and is finally acquitted. -- Unpleasant!

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1945
Publisher: Doubleday, Doran