ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 14, 2012

"A wickedly funny ramble. With bunnies. (Satiric mystery. 9-14)"
Horvath takes on the world of talking animals with all the absurdist, satirical panache fans have come to expect from the award-winning author. Read full book review >
EARWIG AND THE WITCH by Diana Wynne Jones
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"Earwig, as a spunky as any Jones heroine, keeps young and old readers chuckling through sadness at an era's end. (Fantasy. 7-9)"
A cunning heroine learns magic in Jones' last, posthumous offering. Read full book review >

ANOTHER BROTHER by Matthew Cordell
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 31, 2012

"This is not just another new-baby book: Cordell's humorous text and mischievously silly, expressive cartoon art will have readers bleating to read it again and again. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Davy, a little sheep, has trouble adjusting to the arrival of not one but 12 baby brothers in this humorous twist on the tried and true new sibling theme. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 24, 2012

"The book, a revision of A Night-Light for Bunny (2004), is only partly successful in execution. Children who want soothing at bedtime may do better with House in the Night, by Susan Marie Swanson and illustrated by Beth Krommes (2008), or the classic Goodnight Moon. (Picture book. 2-5)"
When Bunny announces that he cannot sleep because "[t]here's too much dark at night," he and Papa go off on the subtitle's promised "Glow-in-the-Dark Search" for the perfect night-light. Read full book review >
PIP'S TRIP by Janet Morgan Stoeke
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 19, 2012

"The lack of perfection is rarely so comically gladdening. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Three hens look at a pick-up truck and dream of flight. Read full book review >

MASON DIXON:  BASKETBALL DISASTERS by Claudia Mills
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 12, 2012

"Altogether, this is an amusing if undemanding account of the typical fourth-grade problems the athletically ungifted face as they make their way through school. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Fourth grader Mason Dixon, in his third series outing, earnestly stumbles from one potential disaster to another, many involving his total basketball ineptitude. Read full book review >
ICE ISLAND by Sherry Shahan
ADVENTURE
Released: Jan. 10, 2012

"As a race for survival, this is also an exhilarating sprint through the pages. (author's note, glossary) (Adventure. 9-13)"
Riveting and atmospheric, this is a tale of teenage Tatum, who becomes lost and separated from her friend on an Alaskan island with only a team of dogs, a few supplies and her instincts to keep her alive. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 10, 2012

"Some readers won't make it through the most painful jokes, but those who do will see something marvelous building itself in front of their eyes. (Graphic novel. 6-9)"
Who says penguins are cute? Read full book review >
MAUDIE AND BEAR by Jan Ormerod
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 5, 2012

"There's fascinating aesthetic composition here, if the relationship doesn't distract. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Picture books are full of odd-couple friendships, plenty of which feature a bear; this example stands out in splendid composition and an unsettling dynamic. Read full book review >
CROCODILE'S TEARS by Alex Beard
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2012

"Ecological storytelling at its finest. (author's note, glossary of endangered animals with colored photos) (Picture book. 4-8)"
Rhino and Tickbird's query about why Crocodile cries tears leads them from one animal to another, triggering troubling and provocative questions about Africa's endangered habitats and its vanishing wildlife. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2012

"This yippy, yappy Yorkie is just another tired puppy in search of a plot. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Macomber and Carney team up for their second entry in the Blossom Street Kids series, this time focusing on an unwanted move to a new neighborhood for a girl named Ellen and her Yorkshire terrier named Baxter. Read full book review >
TIGER'S VOYAGE by Colleen Houck
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2012

"Hankies, cold showers and possibly a neck brace for all the emotional whiplash are recommended. (Paranormal romance. 13 & up)"
Hunky Indian were-tiger-sibling rivals continue to claw at the heart of their American lady love in this quest quartet's penultimate doorstopper. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >