HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MR CROC! by Jo Lodge
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Some literal jaw-dropping at the climax gives this party-hearty pop-up a big finish. (Pop-up picture book. 1-3)"
Toddlers who find Lodge's Happy Birthday Moo Moo (2001) a touch tame will happily fasten on this toothier follow-up, a British import.Read full book review >
I LOVE KISSES by Camilla de la Bédoyère
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Unfortunately, the Hallmark sentiments in the primary text make this book feel generic and just transitorily cute. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Fifteen examples of animal affection, which looks not so different than the human kind. Read full book review >

PAKKUN THE WOLF AND HIS DINOSAUR FRIENDS by Yasuko Kimura
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"A bland tale for diaper-clad dinophiles, mildly spiced with visual pleasures and surprises. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Children who dote on silly, googly-eyed monsters need look no further than this imported tale of a wolf chasing an errant chicken egg. Read full book review >
MAZEL TOV! IT'S A BOY/MAZEL TOV! IT'S A GIRL by Jamie Korngold
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"A joyful and eminently useful book. (Picture book/religion. 2-7)"
The joy of welcoming a new baby into a Jewish home is portrayed in this dos-à-dos, dual-gender photo essay. Read full book review >
FAMILIES by Shelley Rotner
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Vibrant photographs—especially action shots—will capture children's attention, build language skills and, one hopes, start conversations. (Picture book. 2-4)"
"We hope this book…will lead children and their parents to engage in conversation about their families." Read full book review >

GRACE by Kate Parkinson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"There is more than one way to shine on stage, as Grace happily attests. (Early reader. 2-6)"
Grace is just not graceful. Read full book review >
OUTDOOR OPPOSITES by Brenda Williams
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"An ebullient book with catchy, rhyming text that's fun to read again and again at home, in the classroom or under a tree. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Poet Williams interprets the concept of opposites in a clever, rhyming book celebrating the outdoors. Read full book review >
GO, PEA, GO! by Joe Moshier
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 28, 2015

"Vibrant visuals cannot make up for a potty book that just doesn't rate. No, Pea, No! (Picture book. 2-4)"
A single pea pushes himself to finish a race in this punny potty metaphor. Read full book review >
WHERE'S THE PAIR? by Britta Teckentrup
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 28, 2015

"Children will enjoy sharing the sometimes quite difficult challenges with their adults. (Picture book. 2-5)"
In another in a series of picture books for the very young designed to exercise their powers of observation, Teckentrup challenges readers to spot which animals are exactly alike. Read full book review >
HOW TO CATCH A MOUSE by Philippa Leathers
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 28, 2015

"Clemmie in a trench coat, using what she's learned, is worth the price of admission alone. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Ginger kitten Clemmie keeps her house mouse-free…or does she? Read full book review >
VINCENT AND THE NIGHT by Adele Enersen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 21, 2015

"Offbeat enough to add to an already-groaning collection of bedtime books. (Picture book. 1-6)"
Photogenic Vincent is a baby who isn't ready for bedtime, so he uses the pen-and-ink blackness of nighttime to create a fantasy world for himself and readers. Read full book review >
MISS MARY MACK by Lucy Bell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 15, 2015

"An excellent take on an excellent song. (Board book. 6 mos.-2)"
The classic song gets put to the page. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >