THIS LITTLE PRESIDENT by Joan Holub
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"Rhymes and sturdy pages do not necessarily make a book right for toddlers; don't expect this little book to please the little people for whom it was ostensibly designed. (Board book. 2-4)"
Presidents for toddlers? Really? Read full book review >
SHHH! THIS BOOK IS SLEEPING by Cédric Ramadier
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"Add this playful purchase to the ever expanding going-to-sleep bookcase. (Board book. 1-3)"
In a nice twist, instead of a book putting readers to sleep, here it is readers who put the book to sleep. Read full book review >

VIRGIL & OWEN STICK TOGETHER by Paulette Bogan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A welcome glimpse into child sensibilities. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Virgil and Owen, from their previous eponymous title, might be best friends, but Virgil still has some friendship lessons to learn. Read full book review >
SHAPE SHIFT by Joyce Hesselberth
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"Most shape books ask readers to find shapes in the everyday world; Hesselberth does the opposite and sparks children's imaginations. (Concept book. 2-6)"
Hesselberth's is an unusual sort of shape concept book, encouraging readers to create pictures from simple shapes. Read full book review >
THINGS THAT GO VROOM by Sterling Children's Books
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"This arbitrary collection of things that go really goes nowhere. (Board book. 1-3)"
Twenty-four vehicles are each depicted on a single page with one sentence that describes what that vehicle does. Read full book review >

MEOW, MOO, COCK-A-DOODLE-DOO by Sterling Children's Books
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A solid but unremarkable read. (Board book. 1-3)"
Little ones learn all about their animal friends. Read full book review >
BELLA'S BEST OF ALL by Jamie Harper
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Cute, but a miss nevertheless. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A little mouse compares her things to her mother's, and all but one come up short. Read full book review >
HIDE AND SEEK by DK Publishing
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Together with its companion, a well-planned, well-crafted option for the littlest book lovers. (Board book. 0-2)"
Part of the Sophie la girafe series, this small, square, interactive board book features Sophie playing a game of hide-and-seek. Read full book review >
THE ITSY BITSY BUNNY by Jeffrey Burton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Leave the hopping to Peter Cottontail and sing the original song instead. (Board book. 1-3)"
An Easter-themed board-book parody of the traditional nursery rhyme. Read full book review >
HOP by Jorey Hurley
by Jorey Hurley, illustrated by Jorey Hurley
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Minimal text yields maximum effect in this book of nonfiction for the very youngest children. (Informational picture book. 2-5)"
Children who have seen bunnies frolic in their backyards, scamper across the lawn of a park, or roam in fields in their imaginations will find Hurley's latest charming and informative in equal measure. Read full book review >
SILLY WONDERFUL YOU by Sherri Duskey Rinker
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"It's sweet, but it lacks the freshness that would make it stand out. (Picture book. 2-4) "
A mother's rhymes enumerate the many, varied (sometimes bewildering, sometimes beatific) ways her toddler tot has altered her life. Read full book review >
COCKATOO, TOO by Bethanie Deeney Murguia
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Sure to become a read-aloud favorite. (Picture book. 2-7)"
Some quite extraordinary cockatoos and toucans meet and greet each other in a fun-filled romp. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >