BIG BLACK BEAR by Wong Herbert Yee
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Big little three-year-olds may not recognize themselves here as quickly as their parents do, but they'll love the funny, rhythmic verse and bold, collage-style illustrations—plus the deft visual transition from big and brash to appealingly small and meek. (Picture book. 1-5)"
Out of the woods he comes, to knock on a door and beg, ``Give me some FOOD and a Big Soft Chair!'' The little girl lets him in, only to discover that he's ``a BIG BAD BEAR with no MANNERS at all!'' Muddy footprints, an upended piano, and a shower of the jellybeans he's greedily munching are just the beginning: ``I'm a BIG BLACK BEAR, and I do as I please!'' Fortunately, a much bigger bear turns up to set things straight and exact an apology (``PLEASE excuse me. Read full book review >
TIME FOR BED by Mem Fox
by Mem Fox, illustrated by Jane Dyer
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Best are the shaggy, drowsy, contented ewe and her lamb; repeated on the jacket, they guarantee a constant audience for this appealing bedtime book. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A gentle litany of good nights, ostensibly from various animals to their young ("It's time for bed, little mouse, little mouse,/Darkness is falling all over the house") but mostly more apposite to their human counterparts ("It's time for bed, little calf, little calf,/What happened today that made you laugh?"), ending, inevitably, with a human mother tucking in a child. Read full book review >

ARNOLD ALWAYS ANSWERS by Deborah Kotter
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Attractive, thoughtfully crafted. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Taking an unusually creative approach to dramatizing antonyms, Kotter's debut book presents a preschooler's day through queries posed by his mother, from the first time she asks, ``Awake or asleep?'' and he hops out of bed until the second time, when he's too drowsy to hear her last whisper. Read full book review >
TWO LITTLE SHOES by Razvan
by Razvan, adapted by Deborah Stupple, illustrated by Razvan
FICTION
Released: Aug. 31, 1993

"An attractive debut. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A playful first book from a Romanian-born artist (now a Belgian citizen) who imagines the adventures a child's shoes might have while their owner sleeps. Read full book review >
CRINKLEROOT'S 25 BIRDS EVERY CHILD SHOULD KNOW by Jim Arnosky
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 31, 1993

For the youngest, a fine concept book. Read full book review >

EVERYDAY HOUSE by Cynthia Rylant
FICTION
Released: Aug. 31, 1993

"A minor effort, but the subjects and attractive graphics are sure to appeal. (Picture book. 0-3)"
One of five board books, the Newbery winner's illustration debut (the others: Everyday Children, Garden, Pets, and Town). Read full book review >
WE HAVE A BABY by Cathryn Falwell
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 15, 1993

"An inviting concept book that should find a warm welcome in many newly expanded families. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Flat, collage-like illustrations in textured, blanket-soft areas of color depict a toddler watching and helping his/her parents care for an infant, each activity captioned with the phrase ``A baby to...,'' and ending with a different verb: ``love''; ``touch''; ``wash''; ``hold''; ``feed'' (this one is breast-fed); etc. The father is shown caring for the baby as often as the mother; the family is generically dark, but not very dark, while the baby has blue eyes. Read full book review >
GO TO BED! by Virginia Miller
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"The simple, totally authentic dialogue and cozily expressive art are just right for two-year-olds like Ba. (Picture book. 1-3)"
In the two bears' third appearance, George is trying to put little Bartholomew to bed, only to get a determined ``Nah!'' (``Ba's'' only word here) to each suggestion, query, or command. Read full book review >
I LOVE YOU AS MUCH... by Laura Krauss Melmed
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Song, however, is far more successful—both because the concept is more original and because it rejoices in the splendidly creative illustrations of Ed Young. (Picture book. 2-5)"
``Said the mother bear to her child,/`I love you as much as the forest has trees''': eight animals utter similar comparisons, sometimes involving food (the sheep loves the lamb ``as much as the grass''), which is logical; but at least one is curiously inapt—the camel loves ``her child...as much as the desert is dry.'' Sorensen provides sweeping double-spread paintings with appealing mother-child pairs, concluding with humans, but, overall, this is a slight effort. Read full book review >
DOG IN, CAT OUT by Gillian Rubinstein
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Charming. (Picture book. 1-6)"
The title's four words, reordered on each spread, comprise the entire vocabulary of this imaginative portrayal of a busy family's day as punctuated by the comings and goings of their pets. Read full book review >
NOAH'S ARK by Lucy Cousins
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"An excellent introduction, without the imaginative humor of, say, Spier's edition, but with a clarity of language and an outstanding graphic design that are sure to appeal to the youngest. (Picture book. 2-6)"
An illustrator known for the innovative use of vibrant color and boldly informal, childlike depictions in her board books and memorable Mother Goose (The Little Dog Laughed, 1990, ALA Notable) offers a very simple, straightforward retelling (``God wanted to punish the wicked people, so he said to Noah, `I shall make a flood of water and wash all the wicked people away...' Noah worked for years and years and years...''). Read full book review >
THE LITTLE RED HEN by Byron Barton
Released: May 30, 1993

"A likable edition that should be a hit with the youngest. (Folklore/Picture book. 1-6)"
Barton, well known for the simple forms and vibrant, creatively juxtaposed colors in his informational books for the very young (Dinosaurs, Dinosaurs, 1989), stays closer to this familiar text than he did in his retelling of The Three Bears (1991), coming up with a good, well-cadenced version. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >