BOO HOO BOO-BOO by Marilyn Singer
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2002

"Boo hoo, this one is a boo-boo. (Picture book. 2-5)"
When trying to do anything new or exciting, there are apt to be some minor bumps and bruises and the children featured in this story manage to shake off their falls and try it again. Read full book review >
BUILD IT UP AND KNOCK IT DOWN by Tom Hunter
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2002

"Part of the Harper Growing Tree series that comes complete with 'tips for reading and sharing.' (Picture book. 2-3)"
Two little boy figures get together for a play date in a simple, repetitive text that emphasizes opposites. Read full book review >

SEASON SONG by Marcy Barack
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2002

"An appealing first foray into the wonders of Mother Nature, from the Harper Growing Tree series. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Sprightly verses arranged in rhyming couplets describe the various hallmarks of the four seasons. Read full book review >
WET PEBBLES UNDER OUR FEET by Manya Stojic
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 9, 2002

"Bright and shining like the sea. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Traveling to the sea with her family, a little girl relives her mother's childhood on an island through her stories. Read full book review >
I USED TO BE THE BABY by Robin Ballard
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 2002

"Though this child is meant to be a model, he seems more patient and helpful than many children would be. (Picture book. 2-6)"
This effort would fall into the "new sibling issues" category, the premise laid out on the first page, "I used to be the baby, but now I am big. Read full book review >

MY BEASTIE BOOK OF ABC by David Frampton
FICTION
Released: April 1, 2002

"Although an audience over four years will be too old for this genre, new readers of five or six may relish the chance to read these silly rhymes out loud to younger siblings. (Picture book. 2-4)"
The one-page-per-letter format is not new, but here each letter is accompanied by a distinct and unusual piece of verse. Read full book review >
WAKE UP, ME! by Marni McGee
FICTION
Released: April 1, 2002

"Start the day off right with this happy and energetic youngster. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The sun is just rising and with it a toddler is waking to take on the day. Read full book review >
GREY MOUSE by Anke de Vries
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2002

"An affirming read. (Picture book. 2-6)"
First published in the Netherlands, this uncomplicated tale about friendship and the journey to self-acceptance now debuts in the US. Read full book review >
PILLOW PUP by Dianne Ochiltree
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2002

"Lots of appeal—even for cat people. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A rambunctious game of chase quickly ensues when a mischievous pup makes off with her owner's pillow. Read full book review >
EGAD ALLIGATOR! by Harriet Ziefert
ANIMALS
Released: March 25, 2002

"A wonderful addition to any collection. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Little Gator doesn't feel tired, so he decides to go exploring instead of taking a nap. Read full book review >
BABY DAY! by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 24, 2002

"Stiff pages with rounded corners and a small format make this a perfect choice for tiny hands. (Picture book. 0-3)"
Simple pictures and text show a baby's day filled with objects of all colors, textures, and shapes. Read full book review >
SMALL by Clara Vulliamy
ANIMALS
Released: March 18, 2002

"While not especially inspired, this is a warm tribute to the relationship of children with their toys. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A lot of things are needed for his first sleepover, and Tom packs and repacks his little suitcase trying to find room for it all; but has he forgotten an important item? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >