BENNY by Sieb Posthuma
by Sieb Posthuma, illustrated by Sieb Posthuma
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"No bone to pick here. (Picture book. 2-5)"
This cheery picture story, first published in the Netherlands, features a young dog reminiscent of Gene Zion's Harry. Read full book review >
IF YOU SEE A KITTEN by John Butler
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Perfect for preschoolers and younger, Butler's tale easily lends itself to group read aloud settings, with each successive reading sure to become more riotous as the children become familiar with their responses. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Butler (Hush, Little Ones, 2002, etc.) leads young readers on an alliterative tour of creatures. Read full book review >

A MUD PIE FOR MOTHER by Scott Beck
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Sometimes the best gift of all is right under one's nose—or snout. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Little Pig goes in search of the perfect gift for his mother's birthday only to find that sometimes the best gifts come when you are not even looking. Read full book review >
BUBBLE BATH PIRATES! by Jarrett J. Krosoczka
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Bathing rituals are never hurt by a dose of invention, though this could well be a one-time exchange: a good idea that kids will want to throw their own twist upon. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Krosoczka, who's had such fun with Good Night, Monkey Boy! (2001) and Baghead (2002), conducts readers through a piratical bath time in what might be considered a bathing primer for the very young. Read full book review >
BLUE HORSE by Helen Stephens
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2003

"This warmly reassuring tale is ideal to share with hesitant little ones. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A tender-hearted tale about overcoming the pangs of social anxiety. Read full book review >

THE LOUDEST ROAR by Thomas Taylor
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Unimpressive, just like Clovis. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Eager to prove that he is the loudest and fiercest animal in the jungle, Clovis, a very young, small tiger, approaches everyone he sees with a loud ROAR! Read full book review >
SCRUBBA DUB by Nancy van Laan
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2003

"Pons's softly lit paintings use watercolors and chalk to appealing effect and her artwork saves this story, but Scrubba Dub as a whole doesn't offer up anything new or interesting to the saturated bath theme market. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Van Laan is known and respected for her abilities with story rhymes. Read full book review >
FIVE GREEN AND SPECKLED FROGS by Priscilla Burris
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"This is worth a look if you're in need of cheery counting books, but it's not a must. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Every children's librarian and kindergarten teacher worth their salt knows ten versions of this finger rhyme. Read full book review >
BABIES by Ros Asquith
by Ros Asquith, illustrated by Sam Williams
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2003

"A perfect choice for an anytime snuggle. (Picture book. 1-4)"
A catalogue list of all the different types of babies begins as their diapered forms start tumbling across the pages. Read full book review >
CALICO’S CURIOUS KITTENS by Phyllis Limbacher Tildes
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Brimming with puckish fun, Tildes's tale is just right for rambunctious little ones. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A kindle of kittens keeps Tildes's lovable cat, Calico, busy in this newest edition to the series (Calico's Cousins, 1999, etc.). Read full book review >
MAYBE, MY BABY by Marilyn Janovitz
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Soft and snuggly, but unfortunately, not unique. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Janovitz (Three Little Kittens, not reviewed, etc.) adds a wishful, animal bedtime lullaby to the already overstuffed shelf. Read full book review >
LET’S DO THAT AGAIN! by Hiawyn Oram
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

After her mother playfully sneaks up on her, Little Brownmouse cries, "Let's do that again!" Mrs. Brownmouse patiently replies, "Hmm, not now, because right now it's time to go home." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >