NORTHWOODS CRADLE SONG by Douglas Wood
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: April 1, 1996

"Children will feel warm and comforted, secure enough in their small realms to fall easily asleep. (Picture book. 1 -5)"
This lullaby of the north has been translated from the language of the Menominee people and then adapted by Wood (Old Turtle, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
LOST CAT by Tad Hardy
by Tad Hardy, illustrated by David Goldin
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"The artist portrays the cat—rightly, readers will say—as a total rascal; he's garrulous, colossally independent, and immune to all human concerns. (Picture book. 2-7)"
A big, round cat—with a face only a mother (or distraught owner) could love—gets lost. Read full book review >

ON THE WING by Douglas Florian
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Nonfiction and humor don't always fit comfortably together, but in this book they become a delightful whole, a sturdy foundation from which to explore the playfulness of language. (Picture book/poetry. 2-8)"
This collection of bird poems and paintings is a fine encore to Florian's Beast Feast (1994). Read full book review >
HUSH! by Minfong Ho
by Minfong Ho, illustrated by Holly Meade
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: March 1, 1996

"A sure winner. (Picture book. 2-6)"
From the author of A Clay Marble (1991), a charming, repetitive rhyme (subtitled ``A Thai Lullaby'') in which a mother shushes all the creatures, from a tiny mosquito to a huge elephant, in and around her thatch-roofed house so that her baby can sleep in the blue cloth hammock. Read full book review >
ADAM PIG'S EVERYTHING FUN BOOK by Selina Young
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Young is right on target with her choice of topics for this audience; the book lives up to its title by providing fun for every child's every mood. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Winsome illustrations of Adam Pig and his extended family will make devoted fans of this amusing work. Read full book review >

"FIRE! FIRE!" SAID MRS. McGUIRE by Bill Martin, Jr.
HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"That stereotyping contradicts the spirit of fresh perceptions shown in the rest of the book, but its bold, breezy tone helps compensate for the offense, and youngsters will be captivated by the colorful scenes and forceful language. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Women are depicted here in a number of unexpected roles, including the heroic. Read full book review >
LAZY OZZIE by Michael Coleman
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Skillful watercolor and ink illustrations add bounce, but never get in the way of the story. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A cumulative tale with a manipulative youngster as its hero. Read full book review >
FLY WITH THE BIRDS by Richard Edwards
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Kitamura's bee-busy, lighthearted illustrations prevent the exercise from becoming too professorial; his trademark clutter will keep children poring over the pages. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A day in the life of an imaginative girl, told in singsong. Read full book review >
OLD MACDONALD by Jessica Souhami
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Grand for the preschool set. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A highly entertaining and inventive version of a favorite song, with plenty of surprises in the gatefolds. Read full book review >
WHEN FRANK WAS FOUR by Alison Lester
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1996

A brilliantly conceived book about seven children, consisting entirely of variations on the same phrase: ``When Nicky was one she spilled spaghetti on her head. Read full book review >
GRANDMA WENT TO MARKET by Stella Blackstone
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 1996

"If the verse lacks poetic acrobatics, it is aerodynamic enough to keep the book, and Grandma's escapades, in flight. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Subtitled ``A Round-the-World Counting Rhyme,'' Blackstone's first book opens with the purchase of a flying Turkish carpet that helps transform Grandma into an international shopper. Read full book review >
THE WIDE-MOUTHED FROG by Keith Faulkner
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"More durable and economical than many of its type, this one is also great fun. (Picture book/folklore. 2-6)"
An effervescent pop-up version of the familiar tale of the wide-mouthed frog who blithely asks each animal he meets what it likes to eat, including an alligator who says that he eats wide- mouthed frogs. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >