PEEK-A-BOO! by Jan Ormerod
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1998

"The uncluttered illustrations show the babies against plain pastel backgrounds, making this simple, happy fare for the very youngestwhat a good idea to build a book around this universal infant game. (Board book. 0-3)"
From Ormerod (Ms. MacDonald Has a Class, 1996, etc.), a good candidate for a baby's very first book; this board book shows seven little ones, all races, all smiles, hiding behind items such as mittens, a bib, a stuffed toy, and a towel; every spread asks the question, ``Where's the baby?'' A fold-down flap (located in the same spot on every spread, supplying the predictability needed by this age group) discloses the baby's face and the various rhyming answers. Read full book review >
123 YIPPIE by Lisa Jahn-Clough
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1998

"If pictures can sing, these do. (Picture book. 1-3)"
All it takes to throw a big party is a houseful of kids, animals, birds, and monsters in droves numbered one to ten; Jahn- Clough (ABC Yummy, 1996, etc.) gets the whole event down on the page. Read full book review >

ZOOM CITY by Thacher Hurd
FICTION
Released: Feb. 28, 1998

"The melange of colors and collage practically guarantees a joy ride. (Board book. 1-4)"
In the new Harper Growing Tree series (see Cummings, above), a Go Dogs, Go! for the '90s. Read full book review >
MY AUNT CAME BACK by Pat Cummings
ADVENTURE
Released: Feb. 28, 1998

"The aunt wears wild and exotic clothing throughout, and sports wonderfully decorated and adorned braids, but what emerges is her independence and sense of adventure, which she succinctly and affectionately passes on to her niece in very few pages. (Board book. 1-3)"
An unusual board book—and entry in the Harper Growing Tree series—that stars an irresistible aunt and a galloping text. Read full book review >
COWBOY BUNNIES by Christine Loomis
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 28, 1998

"Few readers will be able to resist the impulse to bolt through these pages again. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Cowboy and cowgirl wannabes—and there are many—will have their boots and ropes ready for singing the praises of cowboy bunnies, romping and riding on toy ponies and cattle: ``Cowboy bunnies/Wake up early/Ride their ponies/Hurly burly.'' All the catchy wishful thinking is paired with gouache paintings done on panels of wood, arranged vertically in various sizes and shapes to imitate murals on the slats of a fence, or placed horizontally across the spread to form a landscape of bathing bunnies. Read full book review >

DO YOU KNOW NEW? by Jean Marzollo
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 28, 1998

"Despite these flaws, the book is fun to read aloud, and the illustrations are welcoming in their rounded simplicity and comforting pastel colors. (Board book. 1-3)"
Do You Know New? Read full book review >
WAKE UP AND GOODNIGHT by Charlotte Zolotow
Released: Feb. 28, 1998

"A pleasing edition: The book's rotations mimic those of day and night in a way that toddlers will comprehend. (Picture book. 1-6)"
In another recycling of Zolotow's past works (see review, above), this new version of a 1971 title that was illustrated by Leonard Weisgard takes a circular approach. Read full book review >
YOU CAN'T CATCH ME by Charlotte Doyle
FICTION
Released: Feb. 28, 1998

"You can almost hear the giggles. (Picture book. 2-3)"
This entry in the Harper Growing Tree series has a text modeled on "There was a little turtle," and several other hand rhymes. Read full book review >
I LOVE YOU SO MUCH by Carl Norac
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Hugs abound among the puffy-cheeked rodents in this mushy, overstated tale and its greeting-card message. (Book-of-the- Month-Club selection) (Picture book. 2-5)"
Resembling in spirit and content such books as Sam McBratney's Guess How Much I Love You? (1995, not reviewed), this book stars Lola, a nut-brown hamster who could be an adopted cousin of Nutbrown Hare. Read full book review >
BARNYARD LULLABY by Frank Asch
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Asch (Water, 1995, etc.) illustrates each lullaby with the simplicity of his Moonbear books; the musical score at the end sets the animal poems to music. (Picture book. 1-3)"
The clucking, mooing, neighing, oinking, baaing, and honking of the barnyard animals are just so much noise to the farmer in his bed, but these are melodic lullabies to the animals in the barn. ``Tuck your legs beneath you,/Legs that love to run./Feel them growing ever stronger./Let the day be done,'' a horse sings to her foal. Read full book review >
ROSIE RABBIT'S BOOK OF OPPOSITES by Patrick Yee
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"The bright paintbox colors and Rosie herself are the primary attractions for very young readers, but authors such as Rosemary Wells and Byron Barton did it first, and did it better. (Board book. 2-5)"
Yee juxtaposes images of Rosie the rabbit's front and back, Rosie on a hot day and a cold day, Rosie under an umbrella and over a gate. Read full book review >
CIRCUS SHAPES by Stuart J. Murphy
FICTION
Released: Jan. 31, 1998

"Beyond that lesson, Miller's clean-cut illustrations offer bright colors and bold geometric shapes, doing for the circus what Donald Crews did for the festive procession in Parade (1983). (Picture book. 2-4)"
Murphy (Betcha!, p. 1460, etc.) adds to the MathStart series with a book about shapes, presenting them in no less than three rings. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sara Paretsky
author of BRUSH BACK
July 28, 2015

No one would accuse V. I. Warshawski of backing down from a fight, but there are a few she’d be happy to avoid. High on that list is tangling with Chicago political bosses. Yet that’s precisely what she ends up doing when she responds to Frank Guzzo’s plea for help in Brush Back, the latest thriller from bestselling author Sara Paretsky. For six stormy weeks back in high school, V.I. thought she was in love with Frank. He broke up with her, she went off to college, he started driving trucks for Bagby Haulage. She forgot about him until the day his mother was convicted of bludgeoning his kid sister, Annie, to death. Stella Guzzo was an angry, uncooperative prisoner and did a full 25 years for her daughter’s murder. Newly released from prison, Stella is looking for exoneration, so Frank asks V.I. for help. “Paretsky, who plots more conscientiously than anyone else in the field, digs deep, then deeper, into past and present until all is revealed,” our reviewer writes. View video >