SOMETHING'S COMING! by Richard Edwards
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Simple, repetitive text. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A surefire ribtickler for older toddlers. Read full book review >
ZA-ZA'S BABY BROTHER by Lucy Cousins
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A delight right down to the endpapers. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Cousins (Noah's Ark, 1993, etc.) plows a well-worked plot: Za- Za is not happy that the new baby takes so much of his parents' attention, but after playing alone with her new brother and helping put him to bed, Za-Za learns that there's still time for hugs and a bedtime story. Read full book review >

FROM MY WINDOW by Olive Wong
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"An amiable book and wintry tribute to one of childhood's happiest experiences. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Looking out the windows of his building in a multi-ethnic brownstone neighborhood on the morning after a snowstorm, a delighted little boy sees snow-covered buildings and trees, adults digging out, children playing, snowplows, salt trucks, and finally a friend with a sled. Read full book review >
WEE LITTLE WOMAN by Byron Barton
Released: May 30, 1995

The echoes of other versions of this tale gain all the invigorating impact of an original in Barton's capable hands. Read full book review >
TRIANGLE, SQUARE, CIRCLE by William Wegman
NONFICTION
Released: May 8, 1995

"Have another biscuit. (Picture books. 2-7)"
Most illustrators outfitting animals and placing them in human situations strive for the naturalistic, but not Wegman. Read full book review >

THE TRAIN RIDE by June Crebbin
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"The chunky shapes of the impressionistic countryside appear in bright chalk pastels; these and the warmly effective finale do hold appeal, but this is a fairly mild trip. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A contemporary looking little girl and her mother climb aboard what looks like a blocky toy train pulled by a steam engine. Read full book review >
THERE ONCE WAS A PUFFIN by Florence Page Jaques
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"The Owl and the Pussy-Cat'' is sure to like this one, too. (Picture book. 2-5)"
An affectionately illustrated version of the old poem about the lonely puffin who befriended his erstwhile prey, the fishes, so he could have them ``for playmates/Instead of for tea'' and learned to eat pancakes instead ``Like you and like me.'' Cheerful full- bleed artwork in Easter egg colors on heavy stock makes this sturdy little book a happy find for toddlers and preschoolers. Read full book review >
BROWN COW, GREEN GRASS, YELLOW MELLOW SUN by Ellen Jackson
COLORS
Released: April 17, 1995

"It's all quite bright and joyfully brief. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Yellow mellow sunlight makes the green grass grow tall. Read full book review >
NIGHT GOES BY by Kate Spohn
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"A sweetly unscientific answer to questions about what the sun and moon do when they're not in the sky. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Spohn (Broken Umbrellas, Macmillan, 1994, etc.) takes a simple observation—that night follows day—and spins a serenely happy fantasy. Read full book review >
KIPPER'S BOOK OF OPPOSITES by Mick Inkpen
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1995

"Also in the series: books of Colors and Numbers (0-15-200647-8, 0-15-200646-X). (Picture book. 1-3)"
Imported from Britain, small concept books featuring the pooch known to toddlers from Kipper (Little, Brown, 1992), Kipper's Toybox, and Kipper's Birthday (both Harcourt, 1992 and 1993). Read full book review >
WHAT SHALL WE DO WHEN WE ALL GO OUT? by Philip H. Bailey
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: April 1, 1995

"Overall, the pictures take little risk and with the text, make this pretty innocuous fare. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Song lyrics don't always translate well to text. Read full book review >
THE HUNGRY LITTLE BOY by Joan W. Blos
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"A simple, familiar episode with beginning, middle, and end, plus gentle repetition, it is made for sharing, with opportunities to identify shapes and colors and to count. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A young child closely observes his grandma as she prepares a snack by peeling a carrot, spreading the peanut butter on bread, arranging three cookies and an apple on a plate. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Gabrielle Zevin
March 3, 2015

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. He lives alone, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. But when a mysterious package appears at the bookstore, its unexpected arrival gives Fikry the chance to make his life over—and see everything anew. “Zevin writes characters who grow and prosper,” our reviewer writes, “in a narrative that is sometimes sentimental, sometimes funny, sometimes true to life and always entertaining.” View video >