ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"A snug tale to share before lights out. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Illustrator Riley (Mouse Mess, 1997, etc.) teams up with daughter and first-time author Nakamura to create a loving bedtime ballad. Read full book review >
A BIG BED FOR JED by Laurie Friedman
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"A funny look at a common parenting hurdle. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The transition from his crib to a big-boy bed may prove to be too much for Jed and his exasperated family. Read full book review >

LITTLE GREEN by Keith Baker
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"This simple, satisfying story will work well with two- and three-year-olds right up to first-graders, and the large full-page and full-spread illustrations and lively text make this a fine choice for story hours with bird or artist themes. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A young artist observes a hummingbird named Little Green that flits from flower to flower outside the boy's window. Read full book review >
ELLIOT’S BATH by Andrea Beck
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"Fans of the books will not be disappointed, but there's not much else to recommend. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Several stuffed animals run into a problem when Socks the monkey inadvertently spills paint on herself and on Elliot the plush moose. Read full book review >
GROWING LIKE ME by Anne Rockwell
HEALTH
Released: March 1, 2001

"Sure to be a bedtime favorite as well as a successful introductory science lesson. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A young boy discovers all the growing things around him as he walks by the woods, through a meadow, and by a peaceful pond. Read full book review >

TOO BIG, TOO SMALL, JUST RIGHT by Frances Minters
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"Not too long and not too complicated, this cheerful little picture book is just right. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A jaunty pair of bunnies embarks on an adventure exploring opposites. Read full book review >
BUNBUN, THE MIDDLE ONE by Sharon Pierce McCullough
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"With McCullough's bright crayon pastels, no-frills art, and simple text, this story would make a great board book. (Picture book. 2-5)"
In this spare picture book, Bunbun resides happily between younger sister Bibi and older brother Benny. Read full book review >
SOME THINGS CHANGE by Mary Murphy
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"Straightforward and accessible for the youngest reader, Murphy's tale offers children a comforting exploration of a challenging and oftentimes unsettling concept. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Murphy's trio of convivial penguins (Please Be Quiet!, 1999, etc.) returns, this time to demystify the nature of change for young readers. Read full book review >
GRUMP by Janet S. Wong
by Janet S. Wong, illustrated by John Wallace
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"An enjoyable romp for little ones and a compassionate reassurance for their exhausted parents. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A weary mom and her tireless tot are the subject of Wong's (This Next New Year, 2000, etc.) humorous and poignant tale. Read full book review >
SEE YOU SOON MOON by Donna Conrad
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"Readers will hanker for a return trip. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Echoes of Good Night, Moon are unavoidable in this nighttime tale, with its young protagonist's "Bye-bye, bedroom. Read full book review >
DOG’S COLORFUL DAY by Emma Dodd
NUMBERS AND COUNTING
Released: March 1, 2001

"Easy and effective. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A pooch's pure white coat becomes a magnet for spills of all sorts in this foray into counting and colors. Read full book review >
MY DOG TRUFFLE by Lynn Reiser
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 28, 2001

"A companion volume, My Cat Tuna (0-688-16874-4) uses an identical format and features an inquisitive green-eyed orange tiger cat. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A curly-haired, brown dog named Truffle takes a winter walk in this little book about the five senses intended for very young children. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >